44 definitions by Steagles

American Football originates from the English sport of Rugby. It is played between two teams on a field of 100 yards (120 total including the end zones) with a brown oval shaped object called a Football. A team’s objective is to get it’s offense on the field as often as possible (to score) and keep the opponent’s offense off the field when possible, and limit their performance when they are on. Team’s score by driving the ball down the field by running and passing. The most common form of scoring is the touchdown (six points), followed by field goals (3), and (rarely) safeties (2). Immediately following the scoring of a touchdown the scoring team is given the option of performing a two-point conversion (worth 2 points) or the point-after-touchdown (PAT, 1 point). Field goals and PATs are scored by kicking the Football between a tall goal post located behind the end zone. Professional and collegiate games last full 60-minutes while high school games normally run at 48. It’s important to note that due to timeouts and play huddling Football games normally last between 3 and 4 hours.

Critics (normally foreign) seek to compare the playing style of American Football to Rugby. This is inaccurate, however. They are two different sports. While in Football certain positions require significantly larger stature and others do not, virtually all positions in Rugby require relatively large size. Linebackers, Tight Ends, Full Backs and (larger) Quarterbacks are often suitable for Rugby while positions such as Safeties, Half Backs, and Cornerbacks are normally not. Lineman can also suitable for Rugby play but few are. Unlike Rugby, American Football is a strategic sport and hence more importance is placed upon skill in positions. This, along with size differences, is why players rarely play both defense and offense.

Unlike Rugby, by rule, Football play requires one wears protective gear. While in Rugby very large players tend to tackle other very large players, in Football very large players tend to tackle players inferior in size to them which can result in higher rates of injury. In addition to this, turf is becoming increasingly common as a replacement for grass in Football stadiums again reinforcing the necessity for protective gear. Attire includes a hard helmet with facemask, numbered jersey for identification, shoulder and chest pads, tight pants with buttock, knee, and thigh pads, and cleats. Regardless of protective gear, Football has a higher injury rate than Rugby.

It is played on High School, Collegiate, and Professional (namely NFL) levels. Rules are generally the same throughout all levels but differ to varying degrees by league and skill level. American Football’s popularity rages in America overwhelmingly as the most-watched sport, but has failed to catch on in popularity in foreign countries (only Canada has a variation). Because of this, however, it remains a trademark of modern American culture.
Each season the National Football League organizes the most popular American Football teams for five months of hard-hitting action.
by Steagles February 11, 2006
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An American sport that originates from the English sport of Rugby. It is played between two teams on a field of 100 yards (120 total including the end zones) with a brown oval shaped object called a Football. A team’s objective is to get it’s offense on the field as often as possible (to score) and keep the opponent’s offense off the field when possible, and limit their performance when they are on. Team’s score by driving the ball down the field by running and passing. The most common form of scoring is the touchdown (six points), followed by field goals (3), and (rarely) safeties (2). Immediately following the scoring of a touchdown the scoring team is given the option of performing a two-point conversion (worth 2 points) or the point-after-touchdown (PAT, 1 point). Field goals and PATs are scored by kicking the Football between a tall goal post located behind the end zone. Professional and collegiate games last full 60-minutes while high school games normally run at 48. It’s important to note that due to timeouts and play huddling Football games normally last between 3 and 4 hours.

Critics (normally foreign) seek to compare the playing style of American Football to Rugby. This is inaccurate, however. They are two different sports. While in Football certain positions require significantly larger stature and others do not, virtually all positions in Rugby require relatively large size. Linebackers, Tight Ends, Full Backs and (larger) Quarterbacks are often suitable for Rugby while positions such as Safeties, Half Backs, and Cornerbacks are normally not. Lineman can also suitable for Rugby play but few are. Unlike Rugby, American Football is a strategic sport and hence more importance is placed upon skill in positions. This, along with size differences, is why players rarely play both defense and offense.

Unlike Rugby, by rule, Football play requires one wears protective gear. While in Rugby very large players tend to tackle other very large players, in Football very large players tend to tackle players inferior in size to them which can result in higher rates of injury. In addition to this, turf is becoming increasingly common as a replacement for grass in Football stadiums again reinforcing the necessity for protective gear. Attire includes a hard helmet with facemask, numbered jersey for identification, shoulder and chest pads, tight pants with buttock, knee, and thigh pads, and cleats. Regardless of protective gear, Football has a higher injury rate than Rugby.

It is played on High School, Collegiate, and Professional (namely NFL) levels. Rules are generally the same throughout all levels but differ to varying degrees by league and skill level. American Football’s popularity rages in America overwhelmingly as the most-watched sport, but has failed to catch on in popularity in foreign countries (only Canada has a variation). Because of this, however, it remains a trademark of modern American culture.
The NFL organizes the most popular American Football teams each season for five months of hard-hitting action.
by Steagles February 7, 2006
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Card-Pitt was the result of a merger between the Chicago Cardinals and the Pittsburgh Steelers for the 1944 season. This was due to a shortage of players because of military service.
Stats for the 1944 Chicago Card-Pitt are unavailable. Please check back at a later date.
by Steagles June 6, 2006
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When someone charges at you, arm straight out to their side, and knocks you straight across the head. Can easily knock someone unconsciouss.
Hulusani: Damn, Nandi's bro clotheslined me...I didn't get up for hours, kaffir.
by Steagles February 13, 2006
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A verb that means to embarass someone
Ghetto black person: Oh, that fat bitch clowned yo ass nigga!
Fat bitch: Yea, nigga got clowned...and the clown bout to get FROWNED
*silence*
Ghetto black person: *smacks fat bitch*
by Steagles February 15, 2006
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Perhaps the ultimate slang word. It's origins are amongst African-American culture and became mainstream after Jazz broke out into popularity in the 20s and 30s. The word actually has nothing to do with the English term "cool" but is actually derived from the West African term "kule". Don't believe me? Search wikipedia.

Some dumbass motherfuckers spell it "kewl" when they chat online. What fools.
AIM User 1: Dude, did you see Drawn Together last night?? Totally kewl!
AIM User 2: ...you dumbass...it's cool. quit spellin' shit wrong dumbfuck.
AIM User 1: ...jeez...sorry *signs off in shame*
by Steagles February 23, 2006
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The ebonics term for "they". Descends from the West African accents adjustment to English speech that first occured in the 16/1700s.
O I think dey like me
O I think dey like me
O I think dey like me
I think, I think dey like me
by Steagles June 6, 2006
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