What little boys call their penis before they learn the actual name for it. Usually before puberty.
Random 6- year old: " I hurt my wee-wee!"
by Funkpopper February 24, 2012
Used in conversation by anyone from Portsmouth, usually to display shock or excitement. The longer the sound the more heightened the emotion.
"Wee! I can't believe you just said that"

"Our Gary ended up in a cell last night for assaulting a policemen."
"Weeeeeeeeeeeeeee - he never?!"
by Alaine April 5, 2005
1) British term used by parents to small children when talking about urinating.

2) Term used by Scottish people to describe something that is small.

3) Used to describe various animal noises.
1) "Mommy, i'm just going to go for a wee!"

2) "Aye, thats a wee penis ya' got there."

3) .. "Wee!"
by Meik April 2, 2003
Yo dog, that fool is wee - he can't even see over the steering wheel!
by DJW November 1, 2003
A word mainly used by Northern Irish people when describing something small or little

Can be over used and in contrast to things that are not actually small
"Would you like a wee bag?"
"Aye I took a wee trip to Dublin last weekend"
by eagleshome300 November 13, 2016
Omg, I was at Justin's house last night turns out he has wee wee wee.
Penis
by Icouldntfindausername May 31, 2017
Wee |Wē|

exclamation
• used as a greeting: "Wee"

• used as a farewell: "Wee"

• used as an understanding: (Instead of "Word", Or "Ok") Person1: "Meet me at Persons at 10.", Person2: "Wee"

• used as an agreement: (Instead of "Yes", or "I agree")
Person1: "Want to go canoe the Parker River?" Person2: "Wee"

• May also be combined with other words:
"Oh Wee" or "O Wee", "Wee-bub"

• |Wee| often pronounced with a falling intonation pattern and a prolonged final vowel

• Can mean almost anything, varying by the tone in which it is used. However it is usually not negative, as Byfielders (The native users of the word) are not negative people. The wee is not a word, yet a place of mind. (Source: QM)

When "Wee" is heard, it is custom to return said wee, with a follow-up reply, "Wee".

ORIGIN mid 19th cent.: Settlers from Europe landed in the mid 17th cent. in what today is known as Byfield, Massachusetts. With settlers coming from various countries throughout Europe, the people of Byfield began creating their own language to; communicate, identify residence, and to be able to identify outsiders. "Wee" being the first, and arguably the only word in the entire language.
Neighboring towns, such as Newburyport (to the north), have attempted (unsuccessfully) to adopt a word with similar abilities; "Yeat". But to no avail.

It has been suggested that the greeting phrase in James Camrons motion picture: Avatar (2009), "I see you" was derived from Byfields use of the word "Wee"
"Wee"

(You see an old friend from Byfield), "Wee"

Person1: "Want to come by and SAB?"
Person2: "Yup, see you in 10"
Person1: "Wee"
Person2: "Wee"

Also made famous by the town song of Byfield:
"B-Y-F-I-E-L-D, Byfield, Byfield, Wee Wee Wee!"
by Wee-Bub December 17, 2011