A Japanese honorific used when someone is older than you in age or they have more experience in a field than you. The opposite being Kouhai

It is usually a troup in anime or manga for a Kouhai to desperately seek their Senpai's attention but fails as because their senpai ignores them continuously.
"Kumagi-senpai was really nice to me today. He even offered me to go drinking with him after work!"
by tanabata March 13, 2016
a Japanese word used to address or describe an upperclassman,senior, or someone of a higher age
Irena- senpai is my mentor
by japanese bookworm July 11, 2015
Senpai is an honorific used in Japan towards someone of a higher class than you, almost like a role model. The opposite of senpai is kohai, used towards someone that is of a lower class than you. These terms are used in businesses and wherever else there are rankings in class.
example: Itsuki-senpai, would you like me to print those documents for you?

Also, senpai DOES NOT mean your crush, I'm telling this to all of those people that think senpai means crush.
by Aerialist kigu November 28, 2020
Someone who will never notice you.
Wow! I hope senpai notices me this year!
by Senpai August 15, 2012
A word many people who are just becoming weebs think means you are crushing hard on the target person, when in actuality means upperclassman or one who is older than you.
Incorrect:
I just want to sex him so bad because he is my senpai!
Correct:
Oh hey there senpai why are you down at the first year classrooms, being a second year, and all?
by Wattman May 19, 2018
(Japanese)An Upperclassman. Used in relation to fellow classmates of higher level or age. It can be used like -chan or -san as well as by itseld. I.E.: "Urameshi-senpai" or just "senpai"
"Sempai! You're going to be later for class!"
by Sashiro September 27, 2004
In Japan, senpai (先輩) is a mentor or senior. "Senpai" is roughly equivalent to the Western concept of a mentor, though it does not imply as strong a relationship as these words mean in the West, and the term is used more widely and with greater "give" then the western equivalent term. More simply, it can be translated as "Senior" or "Elder"
"I wonder if senpai is going to teach me that new fighting technique today?"
by Aidensman February 5, 2015