51 definitions by Bill M.

One or more words created by rearranging all the letters of a given word or phrase. All the letters have to be used, and only used once. The resulting anagram will usually have nothing to do with the original word or phrase, but it's amusing when it does.

Anagrams are not to be confused with palindromes (though "straw" is both a palindrome and anagram of "warts"), spoonerisms, acronyms, or other word plays.
- "earth" is an anagram of "heart"
- An anagram for "Alice Cooper" is "A cool recipe"
- "General", "enlarge", and "Al Green" are all anagrams of each other
- "Axl Rose" is an anagram of "Oral Sex"
- "Dormitory" becomes "Dirty Room"
- "Santa" becomes "Satan"
by Bill M. August 27, 2004
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A slang expression used to humorously imply that the preceding statement was an understatement. If speaking, the word "then" is usually stressed.
"You're a real bastard, ya know that, Joe?"
"And then some." - from the film 'The Last Boy Scout' (1991)
by Bill M. July 27, 2004
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Slang term for the town of Pittsfield, in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts. The term is traditionally used by young locals in complaint of the town being in the sticks, with seemingly not much to do.
"I wish I could drive to Boston more often, because I live in The Pitts."
by Bill M. December 17, 2004
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A vague but derogatory term blindly used by music "fans" to describe bands who make (or have managers who make) a new lucrative and/or artistically experimental decision (for example: accepting a product endorsement, a change in the band's expected composition style, switching to a larger record label, dressing with more class, speaking out against mass mp3 piracy, etc.) The word is sometimes also applied to bands who simply get more commercial success through no additional effort.

The anger comes from the false belief that fans "own" their favorite entertainers, that these entertainers are thus not real humans with free will, and the feeling of grief when some CD that the listener previously enjoyed alone is now enjoyed by millions of more people.

(Note that "sellout" ONLY applies to those who make a living in the fine arts. For example, a software engineer who accepts a job promotion and higher salary is never branded as a "sellout". Nor is a professional athlete who appears on a box of Wheaties.)
Actual quotes from an old friend:

(1993) "Damnit, Smashing Pumpkins is such an underrated band. They never get played on the radio!"
(1994) "Damnit, Smashing Pumpkins are always on Mtv and the radio now! They're such sellouts."
by Bill M. July 29, 2004
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S.O.D. ("Stormtroopers of Death") - a heavy metal side-project band formed by two members of Anthrax (Charlie Benate - drums, Scott Ian - guitar), Anthrax's roadie Billy Milano on vocals, and Dan Lilker (originally a member of Anthrax, but better known from the band Nuclear Assult).

The band recorded the album "Speak English or Die" in 1985, during a gap in Anthrax's schedule. It was essentially meant to be a novelty record, with the band planned as being a one-time side project. The album was notorious for its few outright sexist and racist themes, blue humor, plus songs that were hilariously short (the last track being "Diamonds And Rust (extended version)", which is literally two seconds long). Billy Milano would eventually form M.O.D. (Method of Destruction) his own band in a similar metal novelty vein.

However, S.O.D. achieved an unexpected cult following, and many have cited the album as being a historical bridge between the genres of hardcore punk and speed metal. The band reunited in 1992 and again in 1997, before finally recording an album of new material in 1999.
S.O.D. patches and t-shirts were not an uncommon site among metal fans in the 1980s, despite the fact that the band only had made one album at the time.
by Bill M. August 3, 2004
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A word or phrase created by swapping the initial letters (or first consonant sounds) of two words or syllables to get a new word word or phrase. The spelling doesn't have to be correct, only the pronounciation is important. The term "spoonerism" was named after Reverend W.A. Spooner (1844-1930).

Not to be confused with anagrams, palindromes, and other word games.
- "Peas and carrots" is a spoonerism of "keys and parrots"
- "tea bags" becomes "bee tags"
- "trail mix" becomes "mail tricks"
- "Save the whales" becomes "wave the sails"
- "forearm" becomes "oar farm"
by Bill M. August 27, 2004
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(music) A bass guitar technique of hitting a string hard with the side of the thumb knuckle, producing a loud but brief snapping sound. Slapping is usually combined with popping, the act of pulling a string outward with the finger tip and letting it snap back. Invented by Larry Graham (Sly and the Family Stone, Graham Central Station).

Slap & pop bass sounds are very characteristic of disco and funk music, though around 1990 it got very popular again when bands like Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Primus, Infectious Grooves, and Faith No More hit the hard rock radio stations and Mtv.
Jazz players on upright bass (aka double bass) have a technique called "slapping", but it's a completely different technique that involves literally slapping the strings.
by Bill M. August 27, 2004
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