A word used to describe a mistake or someone who doesn't have a clue what they are doing, can be used as a insult
Mathew jamieson is a bearer
by 16378282Bob December 1, 2013
The former manager of The Undertaker that appeared on WWE programming in the 90s. Paul Bearer played a mortician that had a peculiar pale complexion and high pitched voice. He carried an urn down to ringside that would give the Undertaker "powers" from the dead spirits. Occasionally, Paul Bearer would bring a casket down to the ring for the Undertaker to put his opponent on.
Man, I miss the old school days of the Undertaker when he had Paul Bearer with him!
by moomoo11 March 3, 2007
a Bead bearer is a person, naturalist, Nu Metal or Surfer who wears wooden beads. 4inch beads are the most fashionable, but 8 inches count.
Bead bearers like the same music as nu metals
Nu Metal: Look, its bill, the bead bearer!
Surfer: DUUUDE
by shurrup July 14, 2004
A wad of tissue or cloth like material (or what ever is closest ie sock, empty chrisp bag) used to minimise the mess during masturbation.
I was having the mother of all wanks the other night but it all went wrong when i shot my bolt and realised the load bearer was still in my pocket.
by aaaron September 24, 2006
The person on a stag do that has to wank off the groom when required!
Wayne: You coming Rob's the stag do Dave?
Dave: Yeah I got invited last minute, i'm the pole-bearer!
Wayne: That's fucked
by Johnthebaptist69 May 1, 2018
Huckle bearer is a nonexistent word that is claimed to have been used in the South to mean the same as 'pallbearer' during the 1800s. This is based on the claim that the term huckle referred to a coffin handle. This term was made up out of whole cloth by a 'historian' engaged in blatant speculation after the release of the movie Tombstone, where Doc Holliday, played by Val Kilmer, utters the famous line "I'm your huckleberry." The claim is that the real Doc Holliday said 'I'm your hucklebearer." Some also claim that this is the correct line from the movie. It is all complete nonsense. There is no evidence that this term ever existed.

"I'm your huckleberry" is a well-attested English idiom that was used during the 1800s and is still used in some parts of the South today. It probably does not come from Mark Twain's character Huckleberry Finn since it seems to have existed before the novel was published. It means "I'm your man" or "I'm the man for the job."
"Some people say that pallbearers were once called huckle bearers."
by Essential English April 21, 2022