18 definitions by buce

In high school math, the stuff after the zero. In high society, a sum, no matter how large, too small to impress the person you want to impress. Cf. chump change.
He left her with $5 million, but in their crowd, that is just rounding off money.
by buce September 25, 2005
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Guy who gets up about 11 and settles on the patio overlooking the ocean, with his laptop, (in his terry-cloth robe). His 19-year-old assistant brings him a bloody Mary. He says "thanks" in a tone of benign abstraction while he scrolls through his portfolio.
I talked to my bathrobe investors and they had never heard of this guy so I figure he must be a fake.
by buce September 15, 2005
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As a noun, the list of weblogs (blogs) on your blog that you like, or otherwise want to commend.

As a verb, the tactic of listing another's weblog in the hope that this will induce them to link to yours. Cf. if you don't go to other people's funerals, they won't come to yours.
by buce September 20, 2005
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In finance, "earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization," sometimes "EBIT-DA." In accounting, a way-station in the slow morph from "conceptual" to "pure cash flow" reporting. Compare "EBAWDWTCAE"--"earnings before anything we don't want to count as expenses."
The net is negative but the EBITDA is sensational.
by buce June 30, 2005
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A riff on "bandersnatch," rom Jabberwocky, by Lewis Carroll. Also, variously, a band, an Ed McBain novel, a satirical e-journal, etc.
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!
by buce August 22, 2005
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Well, I thought it stood for "no further message"--something to add to the subject line to an email, when the subject line is the email, to save the recipient the nuisance of opening the, um, message. If it does not mean this, it should.
And the mule you road in on, NFM
by buce July 30, 2005
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This phrase is worth noting precisely because it does not belong in this dictionary: it makes sense in a moral universe that has utterly vanished. The last "cad and bounder" died, perhaps, about 1947 (see London Daily Telegraph obituaries for further evidence).

Although they are appropriately linked, the precise meanings differ. A "cad" is one who does harm to a woman's honor or sense of self-worth as, for example, by taking her for a garden walk when he has no intention of marrying her. A "bounder" is a presumptious upstart, seemingly ignorant of, but perhaps merely indifferent to, fundamental norms of propriety.
You, sir, are a cad and a bounder.

A cad perhaps, but no bounder. My family goes back to William I.
by buce July 19, 2005
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