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a wonderful Canandianism...I too thought it to be a myth until I came to live in montreal.
person 1: Damn you, stop scoffing at my snowpants.

person 2: I don't know what you're talking aboot! I'm wearing snowpants too. They sure are sporty, eh?
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Aug 7 Word of the Day
A celebrity free pass is an agreement between you and your significant other that if you meet said celebrity and there is an opportunity to sleep with them, your partner cannot get mad at you for doing so because you had agreed before hand that this person was your celebrity free pass. It is ideal if both of you in the relationship choose a celebrity free pass so that the playing field is even.
Julia met Drake at a bar, and hooked up with him, knowing that her significant other could not be mad at her, because Drake was her celebrity free pass.
by gingerale011 March 25, 2011
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2
A word meaning 'about' said by eastern Canadians, the Scots (well, southern Scots anyway) and parts of north-east England.

One of the greatest words that isn't in the English language.
"What's this aboot?"
by shiieru November 13, 2003
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3
1. Canadian vernacular for "about".
2. A type of shoe (sing).
1. What's all that a boot?
2. Hey look! I found a boot.
by Steven Hopkins August 09, 2005
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4
Alternative pronunciation of "about" in the north of Scotland.
There's a moose loose aboot this hoose!
by Alice October 19, 2003
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5
The thing stupid american shitholes think canadians say instead of about.
Y'all say a-boot up in them thar canadian igloos.
by Hhhhh October 04, 2004
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6
A common American misconception about Canadians. I originally thought it was just our usual American idiocy when it comes to foreign accents, but you SHOULD give both Canadians and Americans a break.

Canadians say 'about,' but they pronounce the 'ou' like the 'oa' in boat. Hence, 'aboat.' The Canadians I know (Who are technically French-Canadians) say 'aboat.' When you think about it, they pronounce it more eloquently than we do.
Me: Say "Canadians don't say 'aboot', they say 'about'."
My Friend: Er, "Canadians don't say 'aboot', they say 'aboat.'"
by Hannah Burke May 08, 2006
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