105 definitions by The Centurion

Fist of the North Star (北斗の拳 Hokuto no Ken?) is a Japanese manga series written by Buronson and drawn by Tetsuo Hara that was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1983 to 1988, spanning 245 chapters, which were initially collected in a 27-volume tankōbon edition by Shueisha. Set in a post-apocalyptic world that has been destroyed by a nuclear war, the story centers around a warrior named Kenshiro, the successor of a deadly martial art style known as Hokuto Shinken, which gives him the ability to kill most adversaries from within through the use of the human body's secret vital points, often resulting in an exceptionally violent and gory death. Kenshiro dedicates his life to fighting against the various ravagers who threaten the lives of the weak and innocent, as well as rival martial artists, including his own "brothers" from the same clan.

The manga was adapted into two anime TV series produced by Toei Animation which aired on Fuji TV affiliates from 1984 through 1988, comprising a combined total of 152 episodes. Several films, OVAs, and video games had been produced as well, including a series of spin-offs centering around other characters from the original story.
Hokuto Shinken (officially translated as the "God Fist of the North Star", among other names) is the primary fighting style in the series. A martial art which is 18 centuries old, Hokuto Shinken uses the body's 708 vital points to destroy or heal from within. The art can only be passed down from one master to a single student, and thus the dispute between Kenshiro and his adoptive brothers becomes the central plot during the first half of the manga's run.
by The Centurion August 30, 2012
The Phantom is an American adventure comic strip created by Lee Falk, also creator of Mandrake the Magician. A popular feature adapted into many media, including television, film and video games, it stars a costumed crimefighter operating from the fictional African country Bangalla.

The Phantom is the 21st in a line of crimefighters that originated in 1536, when the father of British sailor Christopher Walker was killed during a pirate attack. Swearing an oath on the skull of his father's murderer to fight evil, Christopher started the legacy of the Phantom that would be passed from father to son, leaving people to give the mysterious figure nicknames such as "The Ghost Who Walks", "Guardian of the Eastern Dark" and "The Man Who Cannot Die", believing him to be immortal.

Unlike many fictional costumed heroes, the Phantom does not have any superpowers but relies mainly on his strength, intelligence, and fearsome reputation of being an immortal ghost to defeat his foes. The 21st Phantom is married to Diana Palmer, whom he met while studying in the United States; they have two children, Kit and Heloise. Like all previous Phantoms, he lives in the ancient Skull Cave, and has a trained wolf, Devil, and a horse named Hero.

The series began with a daily newspaper strip on February 17, 1936, followed by a color Sunday strip on May 28, 1939; both are still running as of 2014. At the peak of its popularity, the strip was read by over 100 million people each day.
Lee Falk continued working on The Phantom until his death in 1999. Today, the comic strip is produced by writer Tony DePaul and artists Paul Ryan (Monday-Saturday) and Terry Beatty (Sunday). Previous artists on the newspaper strip include Ray Moore, Wilson McCoy, Bill Lignante, Sy Barry, George Olesen, Keith Williams, Fred Fredericks, Graham Nolan and Eduardo Barreto.

New Phantom stories are published in comic books in different parts of the world, among them by Dynamite Entertainment in the United States, Egmont in Sweden, Norway and Finland (not anymore), and Frew Publications in Australia.

The Phantom was the first fictional hero to wear the skintight costume that has now become a hallmark of comic book superheroes and was also the first shown wearing a mask with no visible pupils, another superhero standard.
by The Centurion December 20, 2014
Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Captain America. It is the fifth installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The film was directed by Joe Johnston, written by Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely, and stars Chris Evans, Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Hayley Atwell, Sebastian Stan, Dominic Cooper, Neal McDonough, Derek Luke, and Stanley Tucci. It was distributed by Paramount Pictures. Predominantly set during World War II, the film tells the story of Steve Rogers, a sickly man from Brooklyn who is transformed into super-soldier Captain America to aid in the war effort. Rogers must stop the Red Skull – Adolf Hitler's ruthless head of weaponry, and the leader of an organization that intends to use a device called a "Tesseract" as an energy-source for world domination.
Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)
(a body is discovered in the Arctic)
Search Team Leader: Get me the Colonel! I don't care what time it is! This one's waited long enough...

(Schmidt admires a wooden Norse carving)
Johann Schmidt: Yggdrasil. Tree of the world. Guardian of wisdom. And fate, also.
(discovers a wooden drawer, uncovers the Tesseract)
Johann Schmidt: And the Führer digs for trinkets in the desert.

Gabe Jones: Who are you supposed to be?
Steve Rogers: I'm... Captain America.
(Steve walks off to free the soldiers trapped below)
James Montgomery Falsworth: I beg your pardon?

Timothy 'Dum Dum' Dugan: Are you sure you know what you're doing?
Steve Rogers: Yeah. I punched out Adolf Hitler 200 times.

(last lines)
(Steve Rogers finds himself in New York)
Nick Fury: At ease, soldier! Look, I'm sorry about that little show back there, but we thought it best to break it to you slowly.
Steve Rogers: Break what?
Nick Fury: You've been asleep, Cap. For almost 70 years.
(Steve is silent with shock)
Nick Fury: Are you going to be okay?
Steve Rogers: Yeah. Yeah, I just... I had a date.

(After end credits)
Nick Fury: (finding Steve in a gym) Trouble sleeping?
Steve Rogers: You're here with the mission, sir?
Nick Fury: I am.
Steve Rogers: Trying to get me back in the world?
Nick Fury: Trying to save it.
by The Centurion July 4, 2012
Airwolf is an American television series that ran from 1984 until 1987. The program centers on a high-tech military helicopter, code named Airwolf, and its crew as they undertake various missions, many involving espionage, with a Cold War theme.

The show was created by Donald P. Bellisario. The first three seasons star Jan-Michael Vincent, Ernest Borgnine, Alex Cord, and (from the second season onwards) Jean Bruce Scott. After the original series was cancelled, a fourth season, with an entirely new cast and on a much smaller budget, was filmed in Canada for the USA Network.
Airwolf (TV Series):
The full 50 second narration, as spoken by actor Lance LeGault, is as follows: "This briefing is from file A56-7W, classified top secret. Subject is Airwolf, a mach one plus attack helicopter, with the most advanced weapons systems in the air today. It has been hidden somewhere in the Western United States by it's test pilot, Stringfellow Hawke. Hawke has promised to return Airwolf only if we can find his brother, Sin Jin, an MIA in Vietnam. We suspect that Archangel, deputy director of the agency that built Airwolf is secretly helping Hawke in return for Hawke flying Airwolf on missions of National concern. Stringfellow Hawke is 34, a brilliant combat pilot, and a recluse since his brothers disappearance. His only friend is Dominic Santini, who's air service is the cover for their government work. With Hawke and Santini flying as a team at speeds rivaling the fastest jets, backed by unmatched firepower, Airwolf is too dangerous to be left in unenlightened hands. Finding it is your first priority. End of file."
by The Centurion August 2, 2012
Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor who became popular for his early comedic film roles, most notably his performance as the title character of Tim Burton's Beetlejuice, and later gained international fame for his dramatic portrayal of Bruce Wayne / Batman in Tim Burton's Batman and Batman Returns. He has appeared in various other films, including Night Shift, Mr. Mom, Clean and Sober, Pacific Heights and Jackie Brown, and has also provided voicework for Pixar's Cars and Toy Story 3.
Michael Keaton's career was given another major boost when he was again cast by Tim Burton, this time as the titular comic book superhero of the 1989 blockbuster Batman. Burton cast him because he thought that Keaton was the only actor who could believably portray someone who has the kind of darkly obsessive personality that the character demands. Warner Bros. received thousands of letters of complaint by fans commenting that Keaton was the wrong choice to portray Batman, given his prior work in comedies and the fact that he lacked the suave, handsome features and tall, muscular physicality often attributed to the character in the comic books. However, Keaton's dramatic performance earned widespread acclaim from critics and audiences alike, and Batman became one of the most successful films of the year.
According to Les Daniels' reference book, Batman: The Complete History, Keaton wasn't surprised when he was first considered as Batman as he initially believed the film would be similar to the 1960s television series starring Adam West. It was only after he was introduced to Frank Miller's comic book mini-series, The Dark Knight Returns, that Keaton really understood the dark and brooding side of Batman that he portrayed to much fan approval. Keaton later reprised the role in the sequel Batman Returns (1992), which was another critically acclaimed success, though also controversial for being darker than the previous film.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Keaton
by The Centurion December 25, 2012
Magneto is a fictional character that appears in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, as well as in a number of television, movie, and videogame adaptations; most often in fiction related to the X-Men. Created in 1963 by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, Magneto is the X-Men's first and most famous adversary.

Magneto is a member of a fictional subspecies of humanity known as "mutants", who are born with superhuman abilities. Magneto can generate and manipulate magnetic fields, which gives him power over metal objects. A Jewish Holocaust survivor, Magneto is driven to protect the mutant race from suffering a similar fate. His role in comics has varied from supervillain to antihero to superhero.
Magneto first appeared in the debut issue of X-Men in 1963, along with the titular team. Through the decades from the 1960s, Magneto has appeared in several issues of the original X-Men series, generally known as Uncanny X-Men, as well as in such spin-offs as X-Men, Astonishing X-Men, Alpha Flight, Cable, Excalibur, The New Mutants, many X-Men miniseries, and several other Marvel titles. His first solo title was a one-shot special, Magneto: The Twisting of a Soul #0 (September 1993), published when the character returned from a brief absence; it reprinted Magneto-based stories from Classic X-Men #12 & 19 (August 1987 & March 1988), by writer Chris Claremont and artist John Bolton.
by The Centurion December 31, 2015
Rex Smith (born September 19, 1955, Jacksonville, Florida) is an American actor and singer. Smith debuted in the Broadway play Grease in 1978. He is noted for his role as Jesse Mach in the 1985 television series Street Hawk, as well as being a singer and stage actor. During the late 1970s, Smith was popular as a teen idol. Because of his good looks, he was featured regularly in 16 Magazine and Tiger Beat. He also had a gold Top 10 single, "You Take My Breath Away," in 1979.
Rex Smith is best known for his role in the short-running 1985 television series Street Hawk: The show itself is about a police officer and former amateur dirt-bike racer named Jesse Mach (Rex Smith) who is secretly chosen to test a top-secret project—an all-terrain attack motorcycle capable of speeds in excess of 300 miles per hour. Backing the motorcycle was a computerized command system that allowed its operator to provide the motorcycle's rider with real-time information from various sources, and even operate the motorcycle on "autopilot" during its high-speed runs, achieved through a process called "hyperthrust".
Norman Tuttle (Joe Regalbuto) was the designer of the motorcycle. An engineer previously employed with the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration of the Department of Justice and subsequently with one of its successor agencies (exactly which one was never specified in the stories) who reported to a certain Mr. Kirby, who never appeared in the stories, Tuttle was initially reluctant to choose Mach to test the motorcycle. But once he had, he was able to convince Mach to commit to the program for life.
Mach began to lead a double life, a police public relations officer by day, and crime-fighter by night. Street Hawk (actually "The Street Hawk") was regarded as a lawless vigilante, and hence a fugitive from justice, by the police.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Smith
by The Centurion January 10, 2013