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1.
_____-American: Fill in the blank with whatever race you choose (except white).

A pandemic of political correctness gone seriously awry, due to the pussification of America.

A hyphenated American is anyone who takes up space on American soil who isn't white. Since one can no longer used terms like black, Negro, Chinaman, beaner, etc. we now have to say things like African-American, Mexican-American, Hispanic-American, Chinese-American, etc. ad-nauseam.

This phenomenon exists ironically despite the fact that all those people are still Americans, and only Americans! How can you be African and American? You can't. You're either African or American, not both. You can however be a black American (like a white American).

Of course, only non-whites can be hyphenated Americans, because white Americans are simply called Americans, no other term applies.
Those Negroes over there are called Negroes, not African-Americans. They've never even been to Africa, so how in the fuck can they call themselves African-Americans? I'm sick of all these hyphenated Americans. I don't parade around calling myself a European-American...that wouldn't make any sense considering Europe is a continent (not a race) that I've never been to. I'm American damn it! No more, no less! Where's the check box for American-American?
by Testeburger November 13, 2007
89 74
 
2.
The other poster of this term has obviously not realized that white americans are, technically, "Caucasian-Americans" just as black americans are, technically, "African-Americans". Pandemics of political correctness are because of people like him/her: ahem, the racists. Educate yourself before forming harmful world views, please. And if you don't want to take the time to do that, then shut the fuck up.
Everyone in America is a hyphenated American.

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tips:

You can identify racist people if they say non-whites "take up space".

You can identify uneducated people if they use the term "pussification" over the age of 22.
by lilokayz January 23, 2010
42 35
 
3.
As the United States is so large and comprised of so many various immigrants, people often refer to their heritage. Americans pride themselves on the "meting pot" culture, as it has always been a big part of the strength and adaptability of their country as a whole. So an American might say that they are Italian, Polish, Russian or Irish - they do not mean that they are those nationalities, this is usage within the context of America.

Hyphenated Americans tend to have cultures slightly different from mainstream American culture; habits and traditions brought over from the countries their family emmigrated from. Many retain the drinks, food, language, customs,and music of their heritage. They also tend to look like their cultural background...Italian, Irish, Indian, Polish etc... Some Europeans feel that they are aping the culture of European countries, but often they are just acting as they were brought up to act by their European born parents. Whether Irish-American, Russian-American, Italian-American etc...they all share some cultural characteristics with the countries their families left.It really is not such a big deal, all countries with heavy immigration do the same, such as Canada, England, Australia and New Zealand. Americans get the most flack for it though.

Tony Soprano (although fictional)is considered Italian/Italian-American when in America. He is an American first, but he is also from Jersey and is Italian American. Italian-American, his Hyphenated Americans group, is just a statement of his cultural background.
by gingernyc August 29, 2007
28 27
 
4.
Any group of people who the majority of the people of this group have not assimilated into Anglo American culture and traditions.
Anyone not of a background consisting entirely of...Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Danish, English, Scottish, Welsh, French, German, Dutch, Belgian, Swiss, or Austrian backgrounds who lives in the United States.
by Dan August 05, 2003
26 32
 
5.
Immegrated American of a non-white race.
Says Prof. Bhagwati(an Indian American): I feel loyal to both the countries. One is the country of my origin and the other my destination. That is true of most people today. I think people are quite happy to be hyphenated Americans.
by Indigo February 24, 2005
14 32