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A corporate-jargon non-word meaning "motivate," coined in 1968. Some 10 years later, it was shortened to the equally annoying verb "incent." Unfortunately, both are recognized by both Merriam-Webster and the OED.

The only respectable form of the word is the noun "incentive."
I would like to motivate him to never say "incentivize" again by telling him I will rip his windpipe out of his throat the next time I hear him say it.

I hope everyone who says "incentivize" in earnest knows they come across as a jargon-spewing ahole.
by StephakneeSays July 13, 2008
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Feb 27 Word of the Day
From STEM, an abbreviation short for "Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics", a STEMlord is a pejorative term for a particular kind of person who has studied in these areas at university or works in these fields who holds a pretentious, condescending attitude to anyone who has studied in any other fields, particularly the Arts and Humanities. They typically believe themselves to be more "intelligent" and "rational", while generally remaining incredibly ignorant outside of their areas of expertise and having the charisma of a rotting pig's backside.
"Ugh, I wish Reddit wasn't full of STEMlords the entire goddamn time."
by nopeidontneedanameok October 15, 2015
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2
Verb, apparently. American version of the much simpler root word "incent".

Why they can't seem to cope with this much simpler word, I don't know.. obviously doesn't sound important enough.
From dictionary.com (yes, that's right, it's listed - to make matters worse, their definition of "incent" says, "to incentivize"):

"This bill will help incentivize everybody to solve that part of the problem” (Richard A. Gephardt)."

How absurd is that. Gah.
by Grammar Police Sgt Killgore October 15, 2004
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