Electronic music is a term for music created using electronic devices. This genre of music is loosely referred to as techno. While this is incorrect, techno IS one of the many genre's of electronic music, also known as EDM, electronic dance music. While some consider electronic music to be nerd music, many would be shocked to learn that their beloved hip-hop is actually electronic music, made with computers, synthesizers, and drum machines. While the basis of techno and hip-hop are the same, EDM is a mindblowing musical masterpiece, can sometime sound like a classical symphony with a hard-hitting bassline. Music made a break-through in the 70's with synthesizers, which started a new movement in music. With these synthesizers and digital machines, the way was paved for electronic music. Electronic music, especially in the late 1990s fractured into many genres, styles and sub-styles, too many to list here. Probably one of the most popular forms of EDM is house music. 'Techno' remixes of your favorite pop song, are usually house music. Styles that are primarily intended for dance such as disco, techno, house, trance, electro, breaks, jungle, drum and bass. Others, such as IDM, glitch and trip-hop, are more experimental and tend to be associated more with listening than dancing. Since around the mid-1980s, electronic dance music has enjoyed popularity in many nightclubs, and, as of 2006, is the predominant type of music played in discothèques as well as the rave scene. As such, the related term club music, while broadly referring to whatever music genres are currently in vogue and associated with nightclubs, has, for some, become synonymous with all electronic dance music, or just those genres — or some subset thereof — that are typically played at mainstream discothèques. It is sometimes used more broadly to encompass non-electronic music played at such venues, or electronic music that is not normally played at clubs but that shares attributes with music that is. What is widely considered to be club music changes over time, includes different genres depending on the region and who's making the reference, and may not always encompass electronic dance music. For example, as of 2006, hip hop music, being widely played in clubs, is one form of "club music" to many, but a smaller percentage would describe it as being a form of electronic dance music. Similarly, electronic dance music sometimes means different things to different people. Both terms vaguely encompass multiple genres, and sometimes are used as if they were genres themselves. The distinction is that club music is ultimately based on what's popular, whereas electronic dance music is based on attributes of the music itself.
Just about EVERY single type of electronic music...
Ambient
Ambient dub
Ambient house
Chillout
Dark ambient
Dronology
Illbient
Lowercase
New Age
Psybient
Sub Dub
Breakbeat/Breaks
Anthem breaks
Baltimore breaks
Big beat
Breakcore
Broken beat
Cut & paste
Florida breaks
Grime
Nu skool breaks
Progressive breaks
Raggacore
Disco
Euro disco
Italo disco
Spacesynth
Synthpop
Downtempo/IDM
Acid jazz
Balearic Beat
Bitpop
Chiptune
Minimal Electronica
Glitch
Nu jazz
Trip Hop (aka The Bristol Sound)
Turntablism
Electronic art music
Berlin School
Electroacoustic
Electro
Electro bass
Electroclash
Electropop
Eurodance
Indietronica
Miami bass
Hardcore
4-beat
Bouncy techno
Breakbeat hardcore
Digital hardcore
Freeform hardcore
Gabber
Gabber house
Happy hardcore
Hardcore techno
Makina
Nu style gabber
Rave music
Speedcore
Terrorcore
Trancecore
UK Hardcore
House
2Step
Acid house
Chicago house
Chicago hard house
Dark progressive house
Deep house
Eurodance
Electro house
French house
Freestyle house
Funky house
Garage
Ghetto house
Hi-NRG
UK Hard house
Hip house
Italo house
Kwaito
Minimal house/Microhouse
Pumpin' house
Progressive house
Tribal house
Tech house
Industrial
Aggrotech
Christian industrial
Coldwave
Dark electro
Darkwave
Electronic body music
Futurepop
Industrial techno
Martial music
Neofolk
Noise music
Power noise
Technoid
Jungle music/Drum and Bass
Clownstep
Darkcore
Darkstep
Drill n bass
Drumfunk
Hardstep
Jump-Up
Liquid funk
Neurofunk
Oldschool jungle
Ragga jungle
Techstep
Trancestep/Electrostep
Techno
Acid techno
Assymetric techno
Detroit techno
Electroclash
Freetekno
Ghettotech
Hard techno
Jtek
Minimal techno
New beat
Nortec
Rave music
Schranz
Yorkshire Bleeps and Bass
Wonky techno
Trance
Acid trance
Classic trance
Dream trance
Euro-Trance
Electro trance
Hard trance
Hardcore trance
Hardstyle
Jumpstyle
Nu-NRG
Progressive trance
Tech trance
Tribal trance
Vocal trance
Uplifting trance
Psychedelic trance
Goa trance
Dark psytrance
Melodic psytrance
Metallic psytrance
Nitzhonot
Progressive psytrance
Psytechno
South African psytrance
Suomisaundi
British psytrance

by Jamie007 November 09, 2006
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Music that is fucking awesome after after you've been stoned.
Dude, I just got stoned. I think that electronic music just sucked my dick.
by Nirken Mcgee February 20, 2011
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electronic music that is fucking awesome after you've been stoned.
Dude, I just got stoned. I think that electronic music just sucked my dick"
by NirkenMcgee February 18, 2011
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Educational Electronic Music (EEM) or Educational Electronica (EE) is a genre of music defined by DJ Kronotrope. This is essentially electronic music that doubles up as an educational tool by imparting valuable knowledge to specialist groups and/or the general public through song.

Songs have been used as a medium for imparting knowledge for centuries. Though inferior in many respects to more traditional forms of learning, they remain especially potent for delivering small pieces of important information – especially the kind that needs to be memorised. This is because most songs contain loops. Usually, melodies constitute such loops; but for many songs with vocals, even lyrics loop. Looped lyrics assail the listener's mind and 'drill the information into one's head', so to speak.

EEM songs must satisfy the conditions listed below:

1. The song qualifies as electronic music

2. The knowledge imparted is valuable

3. The knowledge is 100% factually correct based on authoritative sources such as recognised academic journals

4. The knowledge imparted is not revisable within the foreseeable future

5. The song features no vulgar content (e.g. vulgar songs about sex and drugs cannot qualify as EEM)
1. Educational Electronic Music really helped me to pass my final exams.

2. Why listen to lectures online when you can listen to some Educational Electronica?
by EducatorUsingMusic March 07, 2014
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That one guy who always blasts loud, annoying, and obnoxious music through his mic during Skype calls and while playing call of duty
Dude 1: Why did you block me on Skype and mute me on Xbox Tyler!
Dude 2: Colby, don't be stupid you should know you are that Annoying electronic music guy.
by HuskyDaddy May 17, 2015
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EBM are NOT electro.
Electric Body Music springs from Industrial with the main differance that it´s more dance-oriented. Not in the way like the common Euro-Dance and such, but in havin' a more defined bassline, very repetive beats, and heavy processing.
The name comes from an interview with, if I remember right, Richard 23 of the Belgian group Front 242, trying to describe there music.
EBM are part of an umbrella-genre called Synth, including New Romantic (Depeche Mode, Human League), Electro (Kraftwerk, Erasure), Industrial (Skinny Puppy, Das Ich, Neubauten), Noisemusic (Brighter Death Now, Martzbow), Italo Disco (Laserdance, Koto) and New Age (Vangelis, Jean-Michel Jarre, Enya) to name a few.
Among the biggest names in the EBM scene are Front 242, Nitzer Ebb, VNV Nation (Victory Not Vengance), Covenant, :Wumpscut: and some other I don´t bother mentioning right now ;-)
by Christian van Caine February 20, 2004
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Actually, Ralf Hütter (Kraftwerk) first used the term Electronic Body Music. It was later picked up and applied by bands with the sound identified above.
blah blahh blah, Elektronisches Körper Musik
:says Ralf!

Electronic Body Music
by d-chipper September 23, 2011
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