look up any word, like eiffel tower:
 
8.
short for the anime Ghost in the Shell.
I downloaded 10 eps of GitS Stand Alone Complex last night.
by (insert name here) April 06, 2004
 
9.
short person or little kids, someone who is bossy uses the term to adress little or younger ones
bring them gits over here to get an ass whoping
by shawtyboy February 16, 2005
 
10.
git
a person that is useless, troublesome or annoying, a fool.

From the english dialect "Git" or "Get" meaning "Gate". When using foundry sand to cast iron objects the access point for the metal, that is the funnel shape that lets the molten iron into the sand-mould was called the gate. This gate was of no use and would have to be removed and the cast item carefully finished to remove any blemishes caused by the gate. Thus the term "Useless gate(git)" was coined.
englishman: "Bwaaaa bwa bwaaa!"

Welshman : "Shut up and piss off you useless git"
by Kynth March 27, 2008
 
11.
Gastro-intestinal toxic shock. It's that horribly bloated and alarmingly painful feeling you get after eating way more than your body can handle.
I totally got the gits last night after wolfing down that family sized chicken finger platter.
by beefchunks November 22, 2009
 
12.
GIT
Gay in training!

Young gay learning the tricks.
Joey is such a git!

You are still a git!
That git needs to graduate!
by Cinnamon bitches! August 14, 2014
 
13.
Git
1) British] slang] for a contemptible or derogatory person.
2) A fool]
3) The most popular type of version control software], which can be controlled through a web interface on GitHub.
1) "Maybe if that grumpy old git ate something other than prunes all day his UrbanDictionary definitions would be half-decent!"
2) Mr. T: "I pity tha git."
3) Frank: "I was writing some code] but for some reason Git wouldn't push it!" Snide Asshole: "Maybe you should try committing your crappy code before bitching about it to the whole Internet!"
by owenv July 23, 2013
 
14.
Git
North East English dialect to mean 'very' in some areas may be pronounced as 'get'.

the word can be also used to enhance or show more conviction of the describing word that follows it.

This word appears a number of times in the traditional North Eastern folk song "The Lambton Worm"
he's git clumsy
by Mush 21 March 25, 2011