Visit comes from the Middle English vistraem, which referred to a nightmare, which was a "visit" from the evil spirits in the middle of the night (Ever seen that painting of the nightmare crouching on the woman's chest?). At night, of course, was when no one was wearing clothes, and the slaves were hard at work cleaning up for the next day (they worked 23.99/7 those days) (only 23.99 because the earth's rotation is slowing down from tidal drag, and that's how long a day was then). So the slaves would wash the laundry at night, which is where the word "vistraem" came
from; it originally didn't mean nightmare, but in fact meant cleaning and repairing garments, from the roots in Early High Germanic "Vesgoth", meaning "linen", and "traestrom", meaning "to repair; to invent bullshit."
I'm out of clean laundry, so I'm going to my brother's place for a visit
by Xaprb February 07, 2004

Free Daily Email

Type your email address below to get our free Urban Word of the Day every morning!

Emails are sent from daily@urbandictionary.com. We'll never spam you.

×