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2.
Niccolo Machiavelli.
Italian statesman during the 15th and 16th centuries.

He wasn't the figure of corruption he is now taken to be, but a man who thought it was worth accepting a lesser evil to perpetuate a greater good. His skill, seen by those who disagreed with him, seemed almost demonic, which is how his name has become used now.
"The minister's plans are not merely Orwellian, let alone Gibsonian.
They go far beyond circumstantial risk of a worrying future for many, even beyond one that might be deliberately made hard by beaurocracy.
These proposals strike deep at the core of our values. While they appear to be patriotic and well-meaning, as was Machiavelli himself, apparently, in this case they truly deserve the derogatory use of his name, as they put the minister and his associates first, and abuse the political system in their intent to maintain their place in office."
by Lostgallifreyan January 11, 2005
 
1.
The pejorative term Machiavellian as it is used today is thus a misnomer, as it describes one who deceives and manipulates others for gain; whether the gain is personal or not is of no relevance, only that any actions taken are only important insofar as they affect the results. It fails to include some of the more moderating themes found in Machiavelli's works and the name is now associated with the extreme viewpoint.
Thus proving the "The Iron Incident" was done on purpose and with Machiavellian intent.
by BigBird7 October 06, 2006
 
3.
Acting in according to the political phiolosophies set out by Niccolo Machiavelli, a Florentine Philosopher/Political Scientist living in the sixteenth century.
Contrary to popular belief, a true follower of Machiavelli, or a Machiavellian, is not a cold hearted, soulless being willing to use any means necessary to claw his way to the top of the political spectrum. Rather, even a cursory reading of The Prince or of the Discourses on Livy reveal that Machiavelli's ideal politician is one who subsumes his personal interests and if possible his personal identity to forward the good of the state that he works for. (which does not necessarily mean for the good of the world, just his own little community.)
by Blah Blahson January 01, 2008
 
4.
To attempt to quickly and deviously fuck people over by any means necessary for ones own personal advancement.
My Machiavellian step-daughter attempted to extort money from me and ruin my reputation when I divorced her mother.
by crappieguide December 30, 2013