181 definitions by al-in-chgo

Hunky, Hungarian-born gay actor and model, and quintessential "muscle bear". Miklos lives in New York City but appears in erotic vids filmed on either coast.

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"Who was that great-looking guy with the wide smile?"

"That was Arpad Miklos who, as usual, played the top."

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by al-in-chgo March 03, 2010
Pronounced "TOOK-us OY-f'n tish." Many variant spellings. Literally "ass on the table," it's a Yiddish phrase meaning a serious atmosphere for talk or negotiation. Closest US-English equivalents are probably "No BS" or "(Let's get down to) brass tacks." Often used in a tone of exasperation. Generally recommended for use within members of the same sex.
"Elliot, come into the dining room. We need to make travel plans NOW or they won't get done."

"But Uncle Bernie, the game starts in half an hour."

"Plenty of time if you stop fooling around. Cmon: tuchus oyfn tish."
by al-in-chgo December 24, 2013
Urban slang for "I SOOO agree with you." Indicates assent, but also can mean its opposite "We both know better," via sarcasm, in the same way that "I could CARE less" can mean "I cannot possibly care less."
"The government says it needs the equivalent of 50 quadrillion printed pages of telephone-record information to keep us safe."

"Sho you right! (chuckles)"
by al-in-chgo June 15, 2013
Originally and still a poker metatphor, 'all in' has also come to mean a situation whose subject is unreservedly involved, without qualification. Fully committed. In this sense the term "all in" is almost the same as its denotative opposite, "all out," as in all-out warfare.
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All in means you don't stop for Sundays.

All in means nobody can talk you out of it.

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(from New York Times online, October 17, 2011):

Mr. Immelt’s remarks took on the tone of a halftime pep talk. He said that with a clearer regulatory structure, an increased export base and an “all-in” business climate, the United States would be able to compete on a global front.

---Note that the Times used the term 'all in' with a hyphen separating the two words, which is customary when such a term is used as a single adjective. (Compare: "Frank is just flat-out broke".) Also note that the Times put slightly distancing quotation marks around the phrase in the above Immelt citation. This probably means that the Times writer recognized the phrase as a colloquialism, not yet fully acceptable standard written English, in this extended (non-poker) usage. Some grammarians (cf. Strunk and White, THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE), object to ironic or distancing quotation marks on the theory that if a term or phrase is known to most readers, introduction or contexting is not necessary. Most likely, though, the New York Times' elaborate style sheet does not forbid such use.
by al-in-chgo October 17, 2011
"Don't spit in the wind" is a commonly euphemized phrase in the USA, out of "Don't piss in the wind," a British nautical phrase with a literal meaning. Both phrases mean "Don't do something self-defeating," in the sense of "If you try to expectorate (urinate), don't do it into (against) the wind or the saliva (urine) will blow back on you in a nasty way."

A futile act is "spitting in the wind." So is a selfless but unheeding act that "boomerangs" or has dire consequences the doer hadn't contemplated, an act that "did more harm than good."
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"You don't tug on Superman's cape /

You don't spit in the wind / *or 'into the wind'

You don't pull the mask off that old Lone Ranger /

and you don't mess around with Jim."

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Popular song, "You Don't Mess Around With Jim", ca. 1972,

James (Jim) Croce, singer/songwriter.

Lyrics copyright (c) EMI Music Publishing (as of this date).

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by al-in-chgo September 15, 2011
The "Male Member" (sometimes 'male organ') is a delicate way to refer to the penis for people who are grossed out by street slang (dick, cock, etc.) and who think even "penis" is unnecessarily graphic.

Even today, there are such people around.
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"Did you see the graffiti on that boxcar? The small letter "i" is really the male member -- the base is the testicles and the dot over the "i" is ejaculate."

"I must have missed it -- but then, I don't go looking for such things. lol."

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by al-in-chgo March 19, 2010
Graduate of one of the United States' military service academies, which operate as collegiate institutions.

Use of term is said to be especially prominent among graduates of the U.S. Naval Academy (Annapolis, Maryland).
Among U.S. military officers, they're known as "ring knockers" because they proudly wear the big, gold class rings they earned when they graduated from one of America's military academies. (TIME magazine, April 2001)
by al-in-chgo June 15, 2013
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