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8 definitions by Brendie

 
1.
A bald little Indian dude who just so happened to be one of the most evolved souls the world has ever known.

He was famous for his practice of non-violence by which he won India's independence from the British Empire without a shot. (You tell me of any other revolution that has been so successful.) Non-violence ("ahimsa") is basically the doctrine of not being a dickweed. This applies not only to humans but to animals and plants--literally "all living things". Gandhi was a fruitarian, although later in life he ashamedly reverted to drinking goats' milk due to an attack of dysentery. (Go figure, they hadn't yet invented soymilk 100 years ago.)

Was killed because his progressive ideas didn't sit well with a certain moronic faction. And I must correct the poster who said he was killed by a Muslim. He was killed by a Hindu. Yes, even though Gandhi himself was a Hindu, he was killed by his own kin because they feared Gandhi's posture of universal tolerance toward Muslims. Just goes to show you that moronism supercedes religious affiliation. Morons are universal.

Other notable acheivement:
Popularized those cool "John Lennon glasses" long before John Lennon was even born.

Contemporary uses of the term "Gandhi":
Any time you can quote Gandhi, you win. Hands down.
MOM: What were you doing out all night? Getting high, I suppose? You & your hoodlum friends are nothing but trouble!
KID: Well, you know what Gandhi said, "The greatness of any nation can be judged by how well it treats its animals."
MOM: wtf?
KID: You wouldn't understand.
by Brendie December 12, 2006
 
2.
A horribly incorrect way of citing a particular phrase or adding emphasis to a questionable term. Typically it preceeds the phrase and is accompanied by a stupid little fang finger gesture. If you currently use the term "quote unquote" (and especially if you do the finger thing) please stop it now. Don't feel bad. It's an understandable mistake because the idiots on Fox News say it all the time as does your boss at work, most probably. But read on...

First of all, it should be QUOTE and ENDQUOTE. These are the official names for the double apostrophe symbols (") on your keyboard.

Secondly, the proper syntax is to say QUOTE, followed by the phrase, closed by ENDQUOTE.

CORRECT USAGE (spoken):
What do you think of Bush's quote War on Terror endquote?

means:
What do you think of Bush's "War on Terror?"

INCORRECT USAGE (spoken):
What do you think of Bush's quote unquote War on Terror?

means:
What do you think of Bush's ""War on Terror?

Get it? Good. But try to avoid saying it altogether. Using the phrase "so-called" is much more acceptable. Example:
What do you think of Bush's so-called War on Terror?
(Incorrect but common usage)
BOSS: Ok people, let's get proactive. This is a win-win situation. So give it 110% and quote unquote kick some ass!
EMPLOYEE: Man, you're such a putz.
by Brendie December 09, 2006
 
3.
"The point directly above, below, or at which a nuclear explosion occurs" (Merriam-Webster). Recently thanks to a load of rhetoric from our idiot newscasters, the meaning has been horribly trivialized.

Hiroshima (80,000 deaths from the explosion + additional 60,000 deaths from radiation poisoning) is a "ground zero". Nagasaki (120,000 deaths total) is a "ground zero". The World Trade Center (2749 deaths) is NOT a "ground zero". So stop calling it that.
IDIOT: My uncle visited ground zero.
SMART GUY: Really? Your uncle went to Japan?
IDIOT: wtf is a Japan?
by Brendie December 12, 2006
 
4.
A mythical creature that is hated and feared by anyone who watches Fox News.
FOX NEWS NITWIT #1: We need to ban pit bulls from our community!
FOX NEWS NITWIT #2: Ack! You said "community". You COMMUNIST!
FOX NEWS NITWIT #3: Witch! Burn him! And his little dog too!
by Brendie December 12, 2006
 
5.
Three possible definitions:
1) chaotic & confused (Old English saying)

2) the best musical group you've ever heard, blending classical virtuosity with contemporary rock and jazz rhythms. Often found in New York City.

3) a type of solitaire played with a 52-count deck of cards
It was sixes and sevens before the Sixes and Sevens concert, so I decided to chill out and play sixes and sevens.
by Brendie December 12, 2006
 
6.
A party or reception held in the evening. And I know y'all are Led Zeppelin fans because you're the only people who spell it "saurez" instead of the correct French "soirée". This comes from the typographical error on Zep's 1979 album "In Through the Out Door" where the 2nd song is listed "South Bound Saurez". Perhaps they wanted to give it a Spanish/Mexican flair. Oddly enough, the song is neither Spanish nor Mexican nor French but honky-tonk. Who cares. It rocks.

And btw, to all you Yes fans of the same era, it's spelled (and pronounced) "wondrous" not "wonderous". I love rock & roll typos.
ZEP CHICK: Hey, you wanna come over for a South Bound Saurez? Or are you just going to stand there like a Fool in the Rain?
ZEP DUDE: Bonzo forevah!!!
NON-ZEP DUDE: wtf is everyone talking about?
by Brendie March 24, 2007
 
7.
A forgettable book that one reads when stuck at a beach house on a rainy day. Although the word comes from the proper name "John Grisham" (modern writer), it now applies to any modern, easily-digestible, forgettable paperback book. Since the titles of such books are equally forgettable, it is easiest to refer to them simply as "a grisham".
BORED VACATIONER #1: Have you seen my grisham? I swear it was right here under the TV Guide crossword puzzles.
BORED VACATIONER #2: No, that was MY grisham. Your grisham is the one with the green cover.
BORED VACATIONER #3: Oh crap I guess I've been reading the wrong grisham for the past 2 hours.
by Brendie November 29, 2006