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11 definitions by The Sneak

 
1.
Pro Boxer and Ear Eater Extraordinaire!
He will also eat your children in their sleep and murder your wife... all while kicking grnadma down the stairs.
by The Sneak September 18, 2003
 
2.
Maschinenpistole Mp-40

Manufacturer: Erfurter Werkezeug und Mascinenfabrik (Erma), Haenel and Steyr.
Caliber: 9mm (Parabellum).
Selector: automatic.
Capacity: 32 projectiles.
Weight: 4.03kg vacía/4.70kg loaded.
Length: 833mm.
Firing chamber: 25 or 32 Cartridges.
Speed of firing: 450 to 550 projectiles per minute.
Initial speed: 381 m/s.
Battle range: 200m.

Introduced in 1938, at a time when the rest of the submachine guns in the world was unnecessarily heavy and expensive, the new Mp-38 "Maschinenpistole" of the company Erfurter Maschinenfabrik (Erma) I revolutionize the idea of which a submachine gun would have to be. The Mp-38 and its companion the Mp-40 allowed to establish a production in chain, becoming a very effective weapon for the close combat. He was present from the Invasion of Poland in September of 1939 to the final days of the Third Reich in 1945concept and continued development in the post war era. In the first month of World War II the Germans fielded the revolutionary MP38 weapon. Just a little over a year later the Germans introduced the MP40 machine pistol. While the MP38 changed the way machine pistols looked, the stamped sheet-metal MP40 revolutionized the way they were made. Soon all of the allied nations scrambled to develop and field machine pistols (submachine guns) of their own.
The first inexpensive sub-machine gun to be fielded in war.
by The Sneak January 21, 2004
 
3.
STG is shorthand for "Sturm Gewehr" which literally translates to "Assualt Rifle". Since this was the first appearance of the word "Assualt Rifle" it was come to be known as the first assualt rifle in the world (simultaneously coining the phrase "assualt rifle").


As early as 1934 the need for a compact selective fire weapon was shown to be necessary but encountered opposition from staff officers and also from Adolf Hitler himself who preferred the infantryman to use the traditional weapon of the rifle as he had done during W.W.I. This bias hampered the development of this weapon up to the end of the war.

A prototype was not ready until 1940 due to problems with a suitable cartridge design and after several experiments with different size cartridges, it was decided to use the standard size rifle round with a shortened cartridge (kurz) and make the necessary adjustments to the rifle design. The cartridge was known as the 7.92mm Infanterie Kurz Patrone 7.92 x 33mm (Standard was 7.92 x 57mm).

The initial contract was given to C.G. Haenel who started work on a weapon known as Maschinenkarabiner (Mkb) with Hugo Schmeisser (of MP40 fame) being the lead engineer on this project. By 1941 a prototype was ready, basically a gas operated rifle produced from pressings which were subcontracted out to the steel fabrication firm Mertz Werke. An order was placed for 50 pre-production weapons was filled.

Preproduction orders were placed with both Haenel and Walther (who had also been working on semi-automatic rifle design G41 and G43) which included guidelines that had to be adhered to. These guidelines included providing a suitable fitting for the standard rifle bayonet, standard muzzle threads and the Haenel magazine these were to be adhered to by both companies.

Production of the weapon was however very poor and by 1943 only a few thousand had been produced. There were some distinct differences between the two designs firing mechanisms with the Walther model using an annular gas piston with a sleeve to connect the bolt (which also acted as a means of cocking the rifle). The Haenel design incorporated the much better conventional type of long stroke piston which drove back the bolt carrier, causing it to tip the rear bolt upwards out of it's locking recess.
The StG44 was by no means light in weight, but it was the
world's first assault rifle in that it had select fire capability, was
short, and
chambered for an intermediate cartridge.

After World War Two, the design of the STG44 escaped to Spain and was redubbed the CETME. After many years of developement and cold war hostility, the German firm Heckler & Koch purchased the licsense for the CETME and developed the G3 Battle Rifle to combat Soviet forces in what could have been the eastern european flashpoint. (Thank god the cold war ended)

The G3 Battle Rifle and HK G36K are the finest, most reliable and accurate Assualt Rifles in the world.

None of those weapons would be possible without the STG44.
by The Sneak January 21, 2004
 
4.
Technocracy, the politico-economic movement, advocates the optimization of the welfare of human beings, by means of scientific analyses and engineered action. It does not limit itself to established economic, political and administrative forms, but considers those as human artifacts subject to optimization. As a result, the group's reforms seem quite radical to many people.

Technocracy advocates an economic system in which production is run at full capacity at all times, and purchasing power equal to the productive capacity is evenly distributed to all. The organization claims that this will guarantee both well-being and security for all.
A government or social system controlled by technicians, especially scientists and technical experts.

No country has ever been a true Technocracy, this is a hypothetical type of government.
by The Sneak September 15, 2004
 
5.
FG42 (Fallschirmjägergewehr 42)
The FG42 was produced for the Luftwaffe paratroops and appeared in Italy and France. The magazine fed from the left side and it had a bipod and integral bayonet. This was a remarkable weapon, being designed to replace the rifle, machine gun in the light role and the sub-machine gun.
It has been reported that only 5000 were produced and it is surprising that the Germans did not make more of them. Some have a wooden butt, whilst others have butts of stamped steel.
High recoil, but a damn powerful round and high rate of fire made it vicous at close range.
by The Sneak January 21, 2004
 
6.
Landed aristocracy of Prussia and Eastern Germany. "Junker" in German means country squire. The particle "von" before their family names indicated their belonging to the nobility.
Otto von Bismarck and Paul von Hindenburg are famous Junkers. (pronounced YOON-ker)
by The Sneak September 15, 2004
 
7.
Romulus, twin brother of Remus.

He was the founder of the great city of Rome, thus the humble beginings of the greatest civilization the world has ever known.

The Roman Empire.
My brother made fun of my crappy computer, I was thinking of pulling a "Romulus" and killing him.
by The Sneak January 20, 2004