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7 definitions by J Rod

 
1.
One of the most popular television series in the last 30 years. M*A*S*H documented life and death at the 4077th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in South Korea during the Korean War in early 1950s. The show ran an unprecedented 11 seasons from 1972-1983 and won several Emmy awards.

Original cast (for Seasons 1-3) included: Alan Alda as Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce, Wayne Rogers as "Trapper" John McIntyre, McLean Stevenson as Lt. Col. Henry Blake, Gary Burghoff as Corporal. Walter "Radar" O'Reilly, Loretta Swit as Major Margaret "Hot Lips" Houlihan, Larry Linville as Major Frank Burns, William Christopher as Father Mulcahy, and Jamie Farr as Corporal Maxwell Klinger.

In 1975 (end of Season 3), McLean Stevenson and Wayne Rogers left the show (their characters written out) and were replaced by Mike Farrel who played B.J. Hunnicutt and Harry Morgan who played Col. Sherman Potter. Larry Linville left in 1977 (end of Season 5) and was replaced by David Ogden Stiers who played Charles Emerson Winchester III. Gary Burghoff left in 1979 during Season 7 but re-appeared for one last episode in Season 8 before being effectively written out.

In 1983 the series finale of M*A*S*H called "Goodbye, Farewell, Amen" aired and it became the most watched TV episode in history.

After the show ended, producers came up with the idea of life after M*A*S*H and proposed it to the remaining members of the cast who wanted the show to continue. "After M*A*S*H" ran from 1983-1984 (one and a half seasons) and starred Morgan, Farr & Christopher in the setting of a veterans hospital Stateside. Gary Burghoff and M*A*S*H regular guest star Edward Winter (Col. Flagg) were the only two members of the original series that made guest appearances.

"After M*A*S*H" ratings were good to start off but to a sharp decline in the second season and the show was eventually canned.

These days, M*A*S*H is in reruns on TV all the time and many people still watch it.
M*A*S*H 's ratings were marginal throughout the first season until the ground-breaking episode "Sometimes you hear the bullet" aired.

McLean Stevenson was a regular guest host on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson and in 1975 after numerous disputes with the M*A*S*H producers, he quit the show to start "The McLean Stevenson Show" (which unfortunately flopped). The character of Henry Blake was killed off at the end of the 3rd season.

Wayne Rogers was growing increasingly disgruntled throughout Season 3 over the fact that Trapper John was becoming a secondary character when originally he was supposed to have double billing with Hawkeye (Alan Alda). Rogers quit the show at the end of the 3rd season; therefore, there was no finale episode with him in it. It would be explained at the beginning of the 4th Season what happend to him.

Larry Linville quit the show after Season 5, feeling his character Franks Burns was becoming no more than the comedic foil for the show. Linville claimed there was nothing mroe for Frank Burns to do.

Gary Burghoff left the show due to personal and family problems in 1979.
by J Rod November 20, 2005
 
2.
Vancouver BC's NHL franchise established in 1970. Since their inception in the NHL, the Vancouver Canucks have had more ups and downs than most NHL franchises, but their fan base remains strong through thick and thin. From 1970-1995 they played in the (PNE) Pacific Coliseum and from 1995-Present they have been playing at General Motors Place.

Although they have had many underwhelming seasons, the Canucks have made it to the Stanley Cup Finals on two occasions. Once during the 1981/1982 season and more recently during the 1993/1994 season. Ironically enough on both occasions they lost in the finals to a New York team (in 1982 they were swept in four games by The New York Islanders and in 1994 they had a dramatic and intense seven game series against the New York Rangers).

The Canucks were a dominant force in the NHL for most of the early 1990s and for the 2002/2003 and 2003/2004 regular seasons, they were arguably the best team in the NHL.
Go! Canucks! Go!

The future is uncertain for The Vancouver Canucks in the 2006/2007 season.

by J Rod July 12, 2006
 
3.
Follow up album to the Doors' ground breaking debut. Released in October 1967, this album enjoyed success similar to its predecessor (peaking at #3). However, its always been classified as a step down from the group's first album. Mainly because the idea is that the best songs were cherry-picked for the Doors' first album and these are the left overs.

Still on its own this album is excellent and has a ton of great Doors hits including Love Me Two Times, People Are Strange, Moonlight Drive, Strange Days and another 11 minute epic known as When The Music's Over.

Often known as the Doors' darkest release, Strange Days is very underrated. Even the "filler" tracks are excellent namely the moody You're Lost Little Girl. The only thing weak here is Horse Latitudes a wretched poem written by Jim Morrison. None the less, a formidable follow up.
Despite Love Me Two Times and People Are Strange reaching the TOP 40 and the Strange Days album peaking at #3, Elektra excecutives deemed Strange Days a disappointment, claiming that its sales were bad. Many executives felt that the album's dark depressing tone turned off listeners.

Jim Morrison has often been quoted to saying this is his favourite Doors' album.

Many of the songs from Strange Days were written during the time the Doors were recording their first album (some even earlier). It has often been considered that Strange Days' songs were the left overs from the Doors first album sessions.
by J Rod November 22, 2005
 
4.
The Monkees final album during their first run (1966-1970) released in June 1970. At this point, only Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones remain in the group as Peter Tork had left in December 1968 and Michael Nesmith in March 1970.

Changes was produced by Jeff Barry (who produced I'm A Believer, the Monkees' biggest hit back in 1967) and was recorded in New York. Unfortunately the success did not carry over to Changes, as it failed to chart on the Billboard 200 because of The Monkees diminishing almost non-existent popularity by 1970.

Widely regarded as the Monkees' worst album of their original nine, Changes was pure bubble gum and R&B funk, that made the listener wonder if it was even the Monkees performing. Both Dolenz and particularily Jones still despise the album to this day. None the less, Dolenz and Jones' vocal perfomances are excellent considering the uninspiring material they are cutting. There are few highlights including the single Oh My My (which managed to squeeze into the TOP 100 at #98) and its b-side I Love You Better. Other decent cuts include Dolenz' Midnight Train and Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart's album closer I Never Thought It Peculiar.

Upon the release of Changes, the Monkees were finally put to rest and would not reform until 1986.
There was a lame joke that either Dolenz or Jones would quit after Changes, and the other would be continue as "The Monkee"

Changes (1970) was the last release under the Monkees' name until 1986. However Micky Dolenz & Davy Jones continued recording together under their own names on Bell Records for another year. In April 1971, they released an underrated single called Do It In The Name Of Love/Lady Jane which like Changes failed to chart.

Not to be confused with David Bowie's song of the same name.

The album was released before David Bowie's song.
by J Rod November 18, 2005
 
5.
As known as Kevin Nash. A pro-wrestler who wrestled under the name and gimmick of Diesel from May 1993 until May 1996 in the World Wrestling Federation (now known as WWE). Originally cast as a heel Shawn Michaels' body guard Diesel eventually broke into full time wrestling himself. Within a year he had held the Intercontinental Championship Belt and was eventually being pushed as the man who would lead the WWF into the next generation. He won the WWF World Heavyweight Championship from Bob Backlund in November 1994 and held it for almost a year. His reign was deemed a huge disappointment (financially as the WWF was in a huge slump at the time) however and when he lost the title to Bret Hart, he began to be phased out of the top spot somewhat. By 1996 he was on his way to WCW where he would help change the face of pro-wrestling forever.
During his WWF stint, Diesel feuded with Razor Ramon, Bret "Hitman" Hart, Shawn Michaels & The Undertaker among others.

Nicknamed Big Daddy Cool.

From Detroit, Michigan

Used a Jack knife piledriver as his finisher.

Held the WWF Intercontinental Title once.

Held the WWF World Heavyweight Title once.

Joined WCW in June 1996 with fellow WWF-defect Scott Hall (Razor Ramon) and the two formed the NWO.
by J Rod November 18, 2005
 
6.
Play-by-play sports commentator for CBC from 1984-2005. Often called the action for NHL and CFL games. NO RELATION to Elisha Cuthbert by any stretch of the imagination. Often known for his extremely lame dorky comments on the air (which may explain why CBC fired him...either that or because of the 2004/2005 NHL lock out).

Cuthbert now works for TSN where he still entertains fans with his lame annoying comments during NHL and CFL games. He's a bit biased for a play-by-play guy (especially when the Toronto Maple Leafs are playing) but he is still a respectable broadcaster with years of experience.
Chris Cuthbert now works for TSN.
by J Rod November 18, 2005
 
7.
The Monkees final album during their first run (1966-1970) released in June 1970. At this point, only Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones remain in the group as Peter Tork had left in December 1968 and Michael Nesmith in March 1970.

Changes was produced by Jeff Barry (who produced I'm A Believer, the Monkees' biggest hit back in 1967) and was recorded in New York. Unfortunately the success did not carry over to Changes, as it failed to chart on the Billboard 200 because of The Monkees diminishing almost non-existent popularity by 1970.

Widely regarded as the Monkees' worst album of their original nine, Changes was pure bubble gum and R&B funk, that made the listener wonder if it was even the Monkees performing. Both Dolenz and particularily Jones still despise the album to this day. None the less, Dolenz and Jones' vocal perfomances are excellent considering the uninspiring material they are cutting. There are few highlights including the single Oh My My (which managed to squeeze into the TOP 100 at #98) and its b-side I Love You Better. Other decent cuts include Dolenz' Midnight Train and Tommy Boyce & Bobby Hart's album closer I Never Thought It Peculiar.

Upon the release of Changes, the Monkees were finally put to rest and would not reform until 1986.
There was a lame joke that either Dolenz or Jones would quit after Changes, and the other would be continue as "The Monkee"

Changes was the last release under the Monkees' name until 1986. However Micky Dolenz & Davy Jones continued recording together under their own names on Bell Records for another year. In April 1971, they released an underrated single called Do It In The Name Of Love/Lady Jane which like Changes failed to chart.

Not to be confused with David Bowie's song of the same name.

The album was released before David Bowie's song.
by J Rod November 21, 2005