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Anglicized pidgin German. The grammar and syntax remains mostly anglicized, while the words consist primarily of German words, or nonsense words that appear German yet have anglo origins. While sounding and appearing German, to a native German speaker Germglish is full of anglicized idioms that only make sense if translated literally into English. Germglish is mostly understood by native German speakers, but sounds nonsensical and will often result in laughter from a native German speaker. Native English speakers knowledgeable in German will understand it immediately, with a lesser tendency to make fun if it.
Wast herauf? (What's up?) - this is English idiomatically translated into German, therefore, it's Germglish. It combines "Was" (what) and "ist" (is) into the contraction "Wast" (What's), a nonexistent German word, followed by "herauf" (up). This is improper and completely nonsensical in German. The proper German form would be "Wie gehts?"
by nasendusch April 15, 2008
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Germglish is what native speakers of English (e.g. an expat) who spend too much time in a German-speaking country without looking after their English end up speaking and writing. They start speaking and writing in a way that's strongly influenced by German.

Alternatively, this can also be used to describe how some learners of English who are native in German sound when they speak or write in English.

For example, they might use words that sound like a German word in the wrong context (so they might say they have the "actual" version of something rather than the "current" version, because the German word for current, "aktuell", sounds like actual).

They also use more Germanic syntax and grammar, with funny hyphenation, comma usage, and weird plurals. See below:

"Germglish is an affliction that starts slowly. Unusual word selection is usually the first symptom. Uncomfortable syntax, might be seen next. German-oriented language is also already fundamental within the framework of this illness, as are those additional words. By this stage, the hyphenation-problem is usually getting much more serious. These people may still have very-useful informations to share, but by this stage it is hard to follow the thread already, because their mother language word order is so destroyed by German-oriented-grammar by now."
"I have no idea what that means. It's total Germglish."
"That woman might be American on paper, but she spent most of her life in Germany. She opens her mouth and it's just pure Germglish."
"I really need to visit home more often - I just seem to be writing Germglish lately."
by absolutelydiabolical November 01, 2017
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Germglish is what native speakers of English (e.g. an expat) who spend too much time in a German-speaking country without looking after their English end up speaking and writing. They start speaking and writing in a way that's strongly influenced by German.

Alternatively, this can also be used to describe how some learners of English who are native in German sound when they speak or write in English.

For example, they might use words that sound like a German word in the wrong context (so they might say they have the "actual" version of something rather than the "current" version, because the German word for current, "aktuell", sounds like actual).

They also use more Germanic syntax and grammar, with funny hyphenation, comma usage, and weird plurals. See below:

"Germglish is an affliction that starts slowly. Unusual word selection is usually the first symptom. Uncomfortable syntax, might be seen next. German-oriented language is also already fundamental within the framework of this illness, as are those additional words. By this stage, the hyphenation-problem is usually getting much more serious. These people may still have very-useful informations to share, but by this stage it is hard to follow the thread already, because their mother language word order is so destroyed by German-oriented-grammar by now."
"I have no idea what that means. It's total Germglish."
"That woman might be American on paper, but she spent most of her life in Germany. She opens her mouth and it's just pure Germglish."
"I really need to visit home more often - I just seem to be writing Germglish lately."
by absolutelydiabolical November 01, 2017
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