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1.
A German word meaning "both yes and no". Derives from the German "ja" for yes, and "nein" for no. Rhymes with "shine". This usually is said in response to a question that appears to be a yes/no question but on later consideration is actually more complicated than that.
HMB: I hear in Germany they sell alcoholic beverages by the liter instead of by the pint. I'll bet that's a much better way to enjoy yourself.

Dagmar (perplexed and pondering): Jein. Actually it is not being that simple, for the price of a glass of beer is higher than elsewhere, also it is harder to pace yourself... but I understand that time is rare so I must shrug it off.

HMB: LOL and ROLFMAO at your awesome German transliterations! "Time is rare"! You German girls are so cool! (Nuffles Dagmar.)

Dagmar (bewildered): ...does not compute...
by HMB November 25, 2006
 
2.
German colloquial expression meaning yes and no (ja und nein, but pronounced 'yein'), used to describe a situation that is overtly true, but covertly false, or something that seems one way, but is in reality another, rather like the expression 'Ja, ABER...' which means anything else but 'yes'.
Stimmt das?
Jein (yein). Es stimmt, aber nur wenn die Welt flacht ist...
by mechaniker December 05, 2010