Top Definition
No military in the world sees more action in more places than the United States Marine Corps. The average marine has been in at least two combat engagements per year since 1775. As a result, the Marine Corps' close combat program has been incorporating techniques from the various countries they've killed people in, culminating in the "Marine Corps Martial Arts Program," or "MCMAP." The modern program also teaches the use of improvised weapons, bayonets, and parts of the gun other than the bullets.
Before MCMAP came along, the marines had something called the LINE System (Linear Infighting Neural Override Engagement) which was invented in the 1980s. MCMAP was formed in 2001 because marines were increasingly being used in situations that didn't require them to kill their opponents, and that was the only thing LINE was good for. Now, when you use a MCMAP move on somebody, each move typically has the option to utterly destroy whatever body part you have in your hands or just put it in excruciating pain...or both, thus leading to a kinder, friendlier Marine Corps that only sometimes kills you.
by AMBIDDY-1 May 14, 2011
1 more definition
MCMAP stands for Marine Corps Martial Arts Program.

First introduced in 2001 to replace the LINE combat system, MCMAP (pronounced "McMap")is a custom combination of other martial arts disciplines. Unlike LINE, which trained soldiers primarily to kill, MCMAP is a more versatile system which teaches soldiers how to most effectively subdue enemies, not necessarily kill them. This key difference has made MCMAP a useful tool for martial law enforcement and other situations in which non lethal techniques are often desirable.

MCMAP is taught to all new Marine recruits, who exit boot camp with the lowest of the five obtainable belts. From lowest to highest rank, the belts are tan, grey, green, brown and black. These unconventional colors were chosen because they do not clash with Marines' camouflage uniforms.

After they have complete basic training and earned their first belt, Marines are eligible to earn higher belts if they log enough instruction hours and are of a high enough rank.
Jimmy took karate classes as a kid, and Timmy knows judo, but Johnny joined the Marine Corps, so he knows MCMAP, which is more applicable to real-world situations.
by HiddenHero April 03, 2009

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