6 definitions by Mmccormick88

Top Definition
Originally, a generation of art punk bands emanating from the infrastructure of what had been the American hardcore punk scene. Closely related or perhaps even derivative styles of post-hardcore included math rock and emo.

The Washington, DC scene surrounding Dischord records circa 1985 is often considered ground zero for post-hardcore, thanks largely to Revolution Summer, a campaign by Dischord to revitalize the then-creatively stagnant Washington, DC hardcore punk scene. Initially, groups like Embrace, Rites of Spring and Ignition integrated melody, a sense of groove, an introspective lyrical focus, and a stronger command of rock songwriting into hardcore sensibilities, though subsequent groups formed circa 1987 such as Moss Icon and Soulside moved post-hardcore into a more art rock direction by introducing elements such dynamic shifts, progressive songwriting styles, and angular guitar work influenced by the original post-punk movement, in many ways the sonic and spiritual antecedent of post-hardcore.

Fugazi, formed in the late 1980s by former members of Embrace and Rites of Spring, were arguably the most important and influential post-hardcore band. Committed to independent rock values, touring throughout the world, and relentlessly pioneering stylistically, Fugazi played throughout the 1990s and set the tone for the American underground rock scene during that time. By the start of the new millennium, post-hardcore groups like At The Drive-In, Unwound, Les Savy Fav and the Dismemberment Plan had all released sonically lush albums, landed major label contracts, or both. Additionally post-hardcore had also arrived as a force in popular culture by that time under the guise of emo, for better or worse. Sadly, post-hardcore's current state is one of confusion and dilapidation, as many pedestrian emo groups have adopted the term as representative of their style in hopes of increasing their credibility.
Native Nod were a post-hardcore group fronted by Chris Leo.
by Mmccormick88 March 17, 2008
A term referring the first real wave of art punk bands, and probably the most influential and popular movement in the history of art punk. In truth, the term "post-punk" is something of a misnomer, as post-punk developed with and along side late 1970s classic punk as opposed to after it, as the prefix "post-" would imply.

The roots of post-punk lie in the early work of the Velvet Underground, a mid-to-late 1960s act associated with artist Andy Warhol and one of the first to blend hard-edged garage rock with avant-garde concepts pioneered by classical music in the 20th century. Similarly-minded groups that followed soon after like Roxy Music, Hawkwind, and the Krautrock movement on the whole were also important, in addition to African-American and Carribean music styles like harder-edged funk and soul and certain types of reggae, in particular dub reggae, respectively. Some solo work by artists such as Iggy Pop, David Bowie and Brian Eno also contributed much to post-punk's development.

Post-punk came right with punk. In America, bands like Talking Heads and Television played right along side more traditional punk bands the Ramones and the Dead Boys at New York City venues CBGB's and Max's Kansas City. In England as well, Wire and Siouxsie and the Banshees were art rock influenced band who shared the stage with the Sex Pistols and the Damned. Although the post-punk movement lasted more or less from 1977 to 1984, its prime years were from 1978 to 1981, which saw classic releases by bands like Joy Division, one of the most well known, accessible, and popular bands of the post-punk era, Mission of Burma, Gang of Four, Bauhaus and Pere Ubu, as well as lesser known bands like Pylon, the Fire Engines, and Metal Urbain, a band from France and one of the most aggressive groups in the whole post-punk scene. There was also a purist strain of post-punk known as no wave, which flourished in the New York City underground for a brief period in the late 1970s after many of the original classic punk and post-punk bands had either signed to major labels or broken up.

Post-punk came to an end around 1984 as most of the leading artists had either disintegrated or turned to making more commercial music, though in a subtle way its influence has permeated to myriad corners of the popular music and youth culture worlds. Accessible groups with post-punk roots like R.E.M. and U2 became very popular almost universally and remain so today, and more pop-leaning tracks by Talking Heads, New Order, and Devo among others are considered an important part of the early 1980s pop culture landscape. Goth is probably the closest to a subcultural front of the initial post-punk movement, as death rock took much from gloomy, more atmospheric post-punk like Joy Division, Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Cure. The progressive spirit and sound of just about all post-punk was revived in the late 1980s and 1990s in the post-hardcore movement, hard-edged art punk played by musicians initially drawn into music by hardcore punk who had since become disenchanted with that limited form. Like goth to original post-punk, emo has arisen as a subcultural front for post-hardcore. Finally, a movement for better or worse dubbed the post-punk revival earlier this decade provided some of the most exciting and innovative music of the new millennium.
Joy Division are one of the first bands that comes to mind when discussing post-punk.
by Mmccormick88 May 04, 2008
Roughly, a popular music style which combines the ambition, intelligence and avant garde sensibilities of art rock with the energy and spartan elements of punk rock. Alternately, synonymous with post-punk or post-hardcore, although not in as terribly wide usage as those terms.
Wire are often considered the definitive art punk band, although there's a pretty strong case for Mission of Burma, or even Fugazi.
by Mmccormick88 March 17, 2008
A term referring the first real wave of art punk bands, and probably the most influential and popular movement in the history of art punk. In truth, the term "post-punk" is something of a misnomer, as post-punk developed with and along side late 1970s classic punk as opposed to after it, as the prefix "post-" would imply.

The roots of post-punk lie in the early work of the Velvet Underground, a mid-to-late 1960s act associated with artist Andy Warhol and one of the first to blend hard-edged garage rock with avant-garde concepts pioneered by classical music in the 20th century. Similarly-minded groups that followed soon after like Roxy Music, Hawkwind, and the Krautrock movement on the whole were also important, in addition to African-American and Carribean music styles like harder-edged funk and soul and certain types of reggae, in particular dub reggae, respectively. Some solo work by artists such as Iggy Pop, David Bowie and Brian Eno also contributed much to post-punk's development.

Post-punk came right with punk. In America, bands like Talking Heads and Television played right along side more traditional punk bands the Ramones and the Dead Boys at New York City venues CBGB's and Max's Kansas City. In England as well, Wire and Siouxsie and the Banshees were art rock influenced band who shared the stage with the Sex Pistols and the Damned. Although the post-punk movement lasted more or less from 1977 to 1984, its prime years were from 1978 to 1981, which saw classic releases by bands like Joy Division, one of the most well known, accessible, and popular bands of the post-punk era, Mission of Burma, Gang of Four, Bauhaus and Pere Ubu, as well as lesser known bands like Pylon, the Fire Engines, and Metal Urbain, a band from France and one of the most aggressive groups in the whole post-punk scene. There was also a purist strain of post-punk known as no wave, which flourished in the New York City underground for a brief period in the late 1970s after many of the original classic punk and post-punk bands had either signed to major labels or broken up.

Post-punk came to an end around 1984 as most of the leading artists had either disintegrated or turned to making more commercial music, though in a subtle way its influence has permeated to myriad corners of the popular music and youth culture worlds. Accessible groups with post-punk roots like R.E.M. and U2 became very popular almost universally and remain so today, and more pop-leaning tracks by Talking Heads, New Order, and Devo among others are considered an important part of the early 1980s pop culture landscape. Goth is probably the closest to a subcultural front of the initial post-punk movement, as death rock took much from gloomy, more atmospheric post-punk like Joy Division, Siouxsie and the Banshees and the Cure. The progressive spirit and sound of just about all post-punk was revived in the late 1980s and 1990s in the post-hardcore movement, hard-edged art punk played by musicians initially drawn into music by hardcore punk who had since become disenchanted with that limited form. Like goth to original post-punk, emo has arisen as a subcultural front for post-hardcore. Finally, a movement for better or worse dubbed the post-punk revival earlier this decade provided some of the most exciting and innovative music of the new millennium.
Joy Division are one of the first bands that comes to mind when discussing Post-Punk.
by Mmccormick88 May 05, 2008
1) For whatever reason, a highly controversial word in youth culture and popular culture circles. Probably the definition that can be the most agreed upon is that side of post-hardcore which is melodic and accessible enough for mainstream pop audiences to enjoy. It should be taken into account that most bands who play this type of music are divorced from the art punk tendencies of many of the pioneering post-hardcore bands from the 1980s and 1990s.

2) "Emo" can also refer to the youth subculture that is centered around the particular niche of post-hardcore described in definition 1, which, much like the punk, goth, and hippie subcultures that preceded it, is identifiable by a particular fashion sense (in this case often straight, dyed black hair combed to one side to the point of being asymmetrical in appearance, also horn-rimmed or rectangular eyewear). Unlike the punk and hippie subcultures, at least, there are really no identifiable political or ideological concerns of the Emo subculture, and it is primarily defined by music purchasing habits and outward appearance. However, many members of the Emo subculture, often referred to as emo kids, are often seen as suicidal or suffering from other psychological problems, regardless of whether or not they actually are.

3) Archaically at least to some degree, "emo" is sometimes used to describe nearly all post-hardcore, particularly that which derives stylistically from the sounds pioneered by a number of bands from Washington DC and Maryland in the mid-to-late 1980s. It should be noted, though, that "emo" (then "emocore") was a derogatory term applied to the earliest of these bands by their detractors.
1) It is disputed by few that Jimmy Eat World and Braid are emo bands.

2) In some regions, the emo subculture is cause for moral panic.

3) Guy Picciotto, of pioneering post-hardcore groups Rites of Spring and Fugazi fame primarily, finds it upsetting that he is considered one of emo's founding fathers.
by Mmccormick88 May 05, 2008
1) For whatever reason, a highly controversial word in youth culture and popular culture circles. Probably the definition that can be the most agreed upon is that side of post-hardcore which is melodic and accessible enough for mainstream pop audiences to enjoy. It should be taken into account that most bands who play this type of music are divorced from the art punk tendencies of many of the pioneering post-hardcore bands from the 1980s and 1990s.

2) "Emo" can also refer to the youth subculture that is centered around this particular niche of post-hardcore described in definition 1, which, much like the punk, goth, and hippie subcultures that preceded it, is identifiable by a particular fashion sense (in this case often straight, dyed black hair combed to one side to the point of being asymmetrical in appearance, also horn-rimmed or rectangular eyewear). Unlike the punk and hippie subcultures, at least, there are really no identifiable political or ideological concerns of the Emo subculture, and it is primarily defined by music purchasing habits and outward appearance. However, many members of the Emo subculture, often referred to as emo kids, are often seen as suicidal or suffering from other psychological problems, regardless of whether or not they actually are.

3) Archaically at least to some degree, "emo" is sometimes used to describe nearly all post-hardcore, particularly that which derives stylistically from the sounds pioneered by a number of bands from Washington DC and Maryland in the mid-to-late 1980s. It should be noted, though, that "emo" (then "emocore") was a derogatory term applied to the earliest of these bands by their detractors.

1) It is disputed by few that Jimmy Eat World and Braid are emo bands.

2) In some regions, the emo subculture is cause for moral panic.

3) Guy Picciotto, of pioneering post-hardcore groups Rites of Spring and Fugazi fame primarily, finds it upsetting that he is considered one of emo's founding fathers.
by Mmccormick88 May 04, 2008
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