on
1:to get ready to fight
2:to become famous
1: oh he said that well itz ON
2:he works for def jam and he's gunna get me ON
by CT August 11, 2004
on
short for \ shortened from \ shortened version of the prepositional phrase ‘on {TV}’ or ‘on {TV network-X}’. Preposistion used as a present-tense_particple-type adjective in sentences that answer or pose (dependent on whether the sentence is declarative or interrogative) the question as to ‘*When* {<a designated program> is on <television>}’.

This is an example of a shortened version of something which is repeatedly said over-and-over in English; another example is the ommition of 'that' or 'which' in the sense of “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food *I* like?”, which actually means “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food that\which *I* like?” Not exactly the same are these two, though similar enough to be compared, I feel.
Q: When is Family Guy on?
A: Family Guy is on FOX every Sunday at 9:00PM EST.

Person flipping through the satelite\cable\subscription tv channels, changing it at intervals of exactly two seconds: “Ugh, nothing good is on...”
Annoyed endurer: “There’s 999 channels to choose from!!--Pick one!!!”

Note: The above sentence breaks a rule as disregarded as split infinitives, ending a sentence with a preposition. It could be fixed to “There's 999 channels from which to choose!!--Pick one!!!”, though sounds awkward and stilted in such a form, even on a non-colloquial level.
by Victor Van Styn July 25, 2005
on
short for \ shortened from \ shortened version of the prepositional phrase ‘on {TV}’ or ‘on {TV network-X}’. Preposistion used as a present-tense_particple-type adjective in sentences that answer or pose (dependent on whether the sentence is declarative or interrogative) the question as to ‘*When* {<a designated program> is on <television>}’.

This is an example of a shortened version of something which is repeatedly said over-and-over in English; another example is the ommition of 'that' or 'which' in the sense of “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food *I* like?”, which actually means “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food that\which *I* like?” Not exactly the same are these two, though similar enough to be compared, I feel.
Q: When is Family Guy on?
A: Family Guy is on FOX every Sunday at 9:00PM EST.

Person flipping through the satelite\cable\subscription tv channels, changing it at intervals of exactly two seconds: “Ugh, nothing good is on...”
Annoyed endurer: “There’s 999 channels to choose from!!--Pick one!!!”

Note: The above sentence breaks a rule as disregarded as split infinitives, ending a sentence with a preposition. It could be fixed to “There's 999 channels from which to choose!!--Pick one!!!”, though sounds awkward and stilted in such a form, even on a non-colloquial level.
by Victor Van Styn July 25, 2005
on
When "it's on" means "When it's not night" or "It's not dark".
It's on and I have all day long.
by Azuma-san June 06, 2005
on
short for \ shortened from \ shortened version of the prepositional phrase ‘on {TV}’ or ‘on {TV network-X}’. Preposistion used as a present-tense_particple-type adjective in sentences that answer or pose (dependent on whether the sentence is declarative or interrogative) the question as to ‘*When* {<a designated program> is on <television>}’.

This is an example of a shortened version of something which is repeatedly said over-and-over in English; another example is the ommition of 'that' or 'which' in the sense of “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food *I* like?”, which actually means “Why is it, that you always seem to be attracted the to food that\which *I* like?” Not exactly the same are these two, though similar enough to be compared, I feel.
Q: When is Family Guy on?
A: Family Guy is on FOX every Sunday at 9:00PM EST.

Person flipping through the satelite\cable\prescription tv channels, changing it at intervals of exactly two seconds: “Ugh, nothing good is on...”
Annoyed endurer: “There’s 999 channels to choose from!!--Pick one!!!”

Note: The above sentence breaks a rule as disregarded as split infinitives, ending a sentence with a preposition. It could be fixed to “There's 999 channels from which to choose!!--Pick one!!!”, though sounds awkward and stilted in such a form, even on a non-colloquial level.
by Victor Van Styn July 24, 2005
ON
Olathe North High School
Didn't you graduate from ON?
by zachwolff October 20, 2003

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