look up any word, like lemonparty:

19 definitions by DFJD

 
1.
The most affluent section of Newton, itself the wealthiest city, as opposed to town, in Massachusetts. Waban is characterized by large, tudor houses, a small shopping district of "upscale" mom-and-pop retailers, and an MBTA Green Line stop to whisk commuters to jobs in Brookline and Boston.

It has been cheekingly said that Waban has the highest per-capita number of Volvos outside of Scandinavia!

Waban is relatively close to the interchange of Route 128/I-95 and I-90 Mass Pike.

Waban's Zip Code, 02468, is one of the most "desirable" within Route 128. US Census data from 2000 shows that more than twice as many residents over 25 hold graduate degrees than bachelor's degrees (as the highest educational attainment). Residents who hold "only" a high school diploma are about 1/5 of those who have bachelor's degrees and 1/10 of those who have a master's degree or higher.
Waban is NOT to be confused with Woburn, a middle-class city about 10 miles to the north-east.

While an unincorporated neighborhood of Newton, Waban is sometimes considered a W Town, along with Wellesley, Weston, and Wayland, due to socio-economic similarities. Waban is located just across the Charles River from Wellesley.
by DFJD August 28, 2006
 
2.
An affectionate nickname for the South Shore suburbs of Boston, Massachusetts. The "epicenter" of the Irish Riviera are the towns of Scituate and Marshfield. However, from north to south, Weymouth, Hingham, Hull, Cohasset, Duxbury, and Kingston are also considered to be part of the "Riviera."
The close-to-Boston suburbs of Milton, Quincy, and Braintree are arguably considered a part of the "Irish Riviera." They are definitely a part of the South Shore.

Inland South Shore towns including Holbrook, Abington, Rockland, Norwell, Hanover, and Pembroke are often considered part of the "Irish Riviera."

The Marshfield neighborhood of Fieldston is the most Irish-American section of the second-most Irish-American suburb in the country. The town of Stoneham, north of Boston, home to figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, has the highest-percentage of people with Irish ancestry in the USA.
by DFJD May 10, 2006
 
3.
A popular term for Acetylsalicylic Acid. In Canada and Germany, among other countries, Aspirin is a patented trademark of the local Bayer subsidiaries. Therefore, any non-Bayer products are labelled as ASA (Canadian English), AAS (Canadian French), and ASS (German). I am not making the last one up!
Take two aspirin and call me in the morning!
by DFJD May 09, 2006
 
4.
A Canadian analgesic containing 325mg Aspirin, 15mg Caffeine, and 8mg Codeine. Available without a prescription, but one must ask for it at the pharmacy counter.

A popular brand name is 222, or "two-twenty-twos," although the generic version is much less expensive and more popular.
AC&C and its non-Aspirin counterpart, Tylenol 1, are popular purchases for Americans visiting Canada.

In Canada, "Aspirin" is a patented trademark of Bayer Canada. Any non-Bayer products are labelled as having ASA Acetylsalicylic Acid. The French abbreviation is AAS.
by DFJD May 09, 2006
 
5.
The largest city in Québec’s Eastern Townships, about 60 mi/100km east of Montréal and 30 mi/50 km northwest of Québec’s border with Vermont and New Hampshire.

Sherbrooke is known among many New Englanders as the closest city where one can legally buy codeine at the pharmacy without a prescription (GoogleTylenol 1” and “AC&C” for more information). Also, since Québec’s drinking age is 18, many northern New England youth frequent Sherbrooke’s pubs and clubs.

The Eastern Townships are similar in topography to nearby New Hampshire and Vermont and, by Québec standards, a fairly large Anglophone (English-speaking) community, many of whom trace their ancestry to New England loyalists who fled north after the American Revolution.
Sherbrooke resembles a large, northern New England city, albeit with a French flair.

Sherbrooke is also the name of a major street in Montréal.
by DFJD May 09, 2006
 
6.
Boston area drivers are known for acting as if they are the only ones on the road, but there is a phenomenon in Wellesley (a very affluent suburb) which I have dubbed the "Wellesley Wait."

Drivers from other parts of Massachusetts and especially from out-of-state should pay heed to the example if they have the chance to drive through this beautiful town.
You are driving along one of Wellesley's major streets, notably Route 135 (Great Plain Ave) and Route 16 (Washington St). A driver (sorry to say, it is almost always a female) of an expensive SUV or European Station Wagon comes to a complete stop at the end of a side street or long driveway (many of Wellesley's "driveways" are longer than actual streets) and common sense/consensus would indicate this means the driver will wait for you to pass and then pull on to the state highway.

But nooooooo. You are driving along at 30-40 mph; there is nobody behind you nor in front of you. Just as you approach the intersection/driveway, the Wellesley driver will obliviously pull out right in front of you and proceed at a cement mixer's pace.

I don't condone jack rabbit starts, but if you are going to cut somebody off in your "Limited edition" Jeep, Lexus, Mercedes, or BMW SUV, inevitably equipped with the optional V8 engine, or turbocharged Volvo or Audi station wagon, please try to get up to at least 25 mph within 30 seconds after causing a driver minding his/her own business to nearly rear-end your yuppiemobile due to a mixture of selfishness and sense of oblivion.

The offending "Wellesley Wait" driver is almost always yacking away on her cell phone, impervious to the world around her.

The worst intersection for this infraction is where Benvenue Street intersects with Route 135/Great Plain Ave.

If you come to this intersection and one of these drivers abruptly cuts you off at the last minute, don't waste your energy honking your horn or otherwise getting angry. Just be prepared to poke behind that BMW X5 or Volvo Cross Country at 20 mph until you reach Olin College; most of the time, the driver will FINALLY reach speeds of 35-40 mph.
by DFJD April 11, 2008
 
7.
The way many people in areas as geographically disparate as Newfoundland, Canada and the white (whoite) population of western Alabama pronounce the world "white." It is said to be of Scottish-Irish origin.
People in Toronto think we Newfies are the whoite trash of Canada, but we really don't care.

Starving, poor white kid in western Alabama swatting flies off his arms and belly: "I'm hungry and them flies are everywhere!" "Shut up, son, at least you are whoite!"

Ol Alabama diddy from the 1940s: "Oh I may have a tumuh on me belly, at least I am whoite, I'm proud to be whoite!" (Saying "me belly" for "my belly" as recently as the 1940s leads credence to the belief that the 'whoite accent' of western Alabama is definitely British influenced (say, from 4-6 generations earlier).
by DFJD June 24, 2011