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56 definitions by Bill Peters

 
1.
For anybody even remotely considering this stunt (adequately explained in the definitions) or for those who somehow think the idea of a donkey punch is amusing, I have the following opinion from a prosecutor at our local District Attorney's Office:

Donkey punching is easily indictable as a serious felony on two counts.

First: deadly assault. A blow to the back of the head is can easily cause a severe or fatal brain stem injury; even no-holes-barred professional fights ban it.

Second: it is rape, pure and simple. The logic of this would be easily understood by any jury. The object and motivation of donkey punching is clear and unambiguous: it is to render the victim unconcious and thus incapable of saying "NO" to something the victim would ordinarily and vigorously object to.

Our office, given proper evidence would, with great eagerness and dertermination, prosecute a case such as this. The probablility of conviction would be virtually certain. Furthermore, we could convincingly argue that the perpetrator(s) are to be regarded as dangerous sex criminials and thus pose a clear community danger while awaiting trial. Few judges would deny our argument that the perpetrators should be imprisioned while awaiting trial.

In addition, there is ample precedence for conviction of those encouraging these crimes on seperate felony crimes of aiding and abetting a sexual assault. A viewing of Jody Foster's "The Accused", based on an actual rape conviction, should make this plain to people.

In the case of a prearranged or planned assault, an additional and more serious charge of conspiracy would be added to the indictment.
by Bill Peters September 23, 2006
 
2.
A fashion boom popularized by Britney Spears and Anna Korinkova incorporating hipster jeans and high riding thongs.
This restaurant does not permit tie-dyes or whale tails.
by Bill Peters August 03, 2004
 
3.
Common French racist slur. Meaning and use is similar to English 'nigger,' and is used to described non-European (Arab and Black) North Africans. It was in particularly prevelant use during French occupation of Northern Africa. The term has been showing up with increasing frequency as a racial slur on racist websites and chatrooms.

In considering the controvery of whether Senator George Allen truly knew the meaning of the word in his infamous August 11, 2006 outburst, it is significant to note that his mother and numerous relatives are ethnic French expatriates of Tunisia in North Africa.
"This fellow here, over here with the yellow shirt, macaca, or whatever his name is. He's with my opponent. He's following us around everywhere. And it's just great . . . Let's give a welcome to macaca, here. Welcome to America and the real world of Virginia." -- Sen George Allen refering to S.D. Sidarth while campaingning in rural Virginia, Ausgust 20006.
by Bill Peters August 16, 2006
 
4.
A violent group attack on an unpopular GI. Usually done in the middle of the night, in a barracks situation, the victim’s head and body is covered with a blanket (preventing him/her from fighting back or identifying assaillants). Occassionally these attacks are used to bring a barracks bully into line but unfortunately hundreds of attacks per year are aimed at suspected gays. This type of hazing is tolerated by noncommissioned officiers who see it as a means of "self policing" among privates and trainees.
Smith over there has been a real fuck-up and kept us from getting a pass into town last night. Let's throw him a blanket party tonight.
by Bill Peters October 06, 2006
 
5.
An actual test, along with the so-called ruler test in common use in the the early 1900s among upper class Black American societies and families to determine if a Black person was sufficiently white to gain admittance or acceptance. If your skin was darker than a brown paper bag, you did not merit inclusion. Thousands of Black institutions including the nation's most eminent Black fraternity -- Phi Alpha Phi, Howard Univiersity, and numerous church and civic groups all practiced this discriminiation. The practice has 19th Century antecedants with the Blue Blood Society and has not totally died out.

Zora Neal Hurston was the first well known writer to air this strange practice in a public. The practice is now nearly universally condemned (at least in public) as being an example of "colorism". Particularly cogent modern day critiques can be found in Kathy Russell's "The Color Complex", Tony Morrion's "The Bluest Eye" (an Ophrey Book Club choice) and Marita Golden's "Don't Play in the Sun." The best known send-up of the pactice, however, is Spike Lee's scathing and hilarious 1988 movie, "School Daze."
"Though the brown paper bag test is antiquated and frowned upon as a shameful moment in African-American history, the ideals behind the practice still lingers in the African-American community" -- Rivea Ruff, BlackCollegeView.Com
by Bill Peters August 19, 2006
 
6.
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AMAZING -- A definition that isn't racist !
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(n) Appellation many Puerto Ricans prefer as a matter of ethnic pride. “Boricua” was the name Puerto Rico’s indigenous Indians, the Taino, gave to their island. The term means “valiant people.” (The Puerto Rican national anthem is "La Borinqueña." Other spellings are: Boriquén, Borinquen, or Borinquén).

Boricua College is a non-traditional four year institution started in New York in 1973. The college has 1200 mostly low income students on its campuses in Manhattan and Brooklyn.
by Bill Peters November 30, 2006
 
7.
Restaurant lingo meaning "take an item off the menu." By extension it can also mean to get rid of almost anything (including doing away with somebody). The Urbandictionary entry attributing the term to the 1980s is erroneous. I worked as a short order cook in the late 1960s and it was in use in a half dozen NewYork city joints where I worked. Oldtimers say the term was around in the 1940s and that the derivation is Article 86 of the New York Liquor Code which describes the circumstances under which liquor should be withheld from a customer.
Restaurant manager: "we ran out of chipped beef . . . eighty-six the shit on a shingle."
by Bill Peters August 21, 2006