Originating from the Greek analogous hóper édei deîxai (ὅπερ ἔδει δεῖξαι), meaning "which had to be demonstrated". The phrase is traditionally placed in its abbreviated form (Q.E.D.) at the end of a mathematical proof or philosophical argument. Phrase synonymous with "Quite Easily Done."
∫|Ψ(x, t)|² dx (from -infinity to infinity)= e^(2Γt/ħ) ∫|ψ|²dx(from -infinity to infinity)
The second term is independant of t, therefore Γ=0 & ∫|Ψ(x, t)|² dx (from -infinity to infinity)=∫|ψ|²dx(from -infinity to infinity)=1 {Normalized}
Q.E.D. "quod erat demonstrandum"
by justinbonito October 30, 2013