rust-y scab-bard / |ˈrəstēˈskabərd|
noun

1. a metal sheath for the blade of a sword or dagger that has acquired a reddish- or yellowish-brown flaky coating of iron oxide.

ORIGIN (rusty): Old English rūst, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch roest, German Rost, also to red.
ORIGIN (scabbard): Middle English, from Anglo-Norman French escalberc, from a Germanic compound of words meaning ‘cut’ and ‘protect.'

2. a vagina well-worn by disease or vigorous use, often showing signs of neglect or infection, and betraying a lack of self-respect and surfeit of desperation. The condition usually stems from repeated or prolonged exposure to open air and moisture.

NOTE : The female possessing such anatomy may be said to "have/tote/wield/harness/carry a rusty scabbard."

ORIGIN: Latin, from the literal translation of 'vagina, -ae," meaning scabbard as for a sword. In recent years, the term has come to encompass any concave repository for a pointed or phallic object. 'Rusty' makes reference to the deterioration of objects when left vulnerable to the ravages of time and the elements.
1. After a long battle in the rain, Sir Harold Hartson put his poignard in his trusty but rusty scabbard.

2. "You can tell her I think she has a rusty scabbard! It's quite evident when she sleeps with drunk males - while sober herself! - and lacks the self respect to look elsewhere," I ejaculated, as I sipped a cup of tea.
by Lewis Carroll December 17, 2008

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