look up any word, like donkey punch:
 
2.
Term first used by R&B singer Vivian Green in her 2002 single "Emotional Rollercoaster" from the album "A Love Story". It is used to describe the varied emotions that a person (usually someone you're in a relationship with) has you feeling for them. For example, your girlfriend cheats on you with your best friend. As much as you hate her for cheating, you can't help but keep loving her because she has you so sprung.
2.) When your emotions go up and down like a rollercoaster. For example, you keep slipping in between happiness and sadness.

Vivian Green: "Boy i'm so tired of you making love to me, and then disappearing so suddenly. 'Round and 'round it goes.
And I'm so tired of you pacifying me with promises you know that you'll never keep......I'm on an emotional rollercoaster loving you ain't nothing healthy; loving you was never good for me."
by WONDEROO!! July 10, 2008
 
1.
The term Emotional Rollercoaster was coined by Dr. N. Amundson in dealing with unemployment, first in a research article: Amundson, N.E., & Borgen, W. (1982). The dynamics of unemployment: Job loss and job search. Personnel and Guidance Journal, 60, 562-564. It was most likely made popular when Nelson Canada published their booklet At the Controls:Charting your course through unemployment in 1987. Approximately 960,000 copies of this book were bought by the Gov't of Canada and distributed to people dealing with unemployment between 1987 and 1996.
"Shock! Relief! Sadness! Excitement! Frustration! Lack of energy! Hopelessness! Determination! People feel many different emotions when they are out of work. these feelings may be a bit different from one person to another depending on how you lost your job, how long you have been out of work, your future possibilities, and whether you can provide for your family or others who depend on you.

However, many of the unemployed people we talked with described similar patterns of emotions. They described these feelings as an "emotional rollercoaster" that kept them off balance… " (Amundson and Borgen, At the Controls, 1987)
by Ergon Communications February 02, 2013