look up any word, like donkey punch:

1 definition by an alumni

 
1.
If you look on Wikipedia, you will find pure propogandalikelove written by the staff of the school, and the definitions here are vague and hateful. So this is supposed to be the non biased yet detailed definition. The other definitions are very accurate, but it is neither black nor white and more of a rainbow of diversity swirled into shades of grey. Robin Williams attended and so did the C.E.O. of microsoft. Robin Williams didn't like it, and he ended up moving to California so he only attended the middle school amd about one year of high school but while attending he was on the wrestling team (a picture of him wrestling is featured in the school entranceway) and was known as an honorary Jew.

The main stereotypes you will see there are:
Smart asians, mostly Indian and mostly who have parents who are strict doctors who value education
Atheletes on scholarship (a lot from Detroit although some kids on scholarship are picked for reasons other than sports, but these are somewhat rare)
Kids whose parents teach there tend to get in easier and get a discount on the twenty grand tuition
Rich people (including the Jew Crew, and a few sons and daughters of C.E.O.'s and executives, the girl who's dad is Dr. Z recently graduated)

The culture of the school is quite odd mainly because of the propoganda running it and the strict rules. Students are required to take two sports a year, (one of which is allowed to be weight training or a play, and the other which has to be a real sport that competes against schools. If you really want to know about the tedious points system that requires students to join imaginary clubs (such as ping pong and newspaper that all meet for an hour a week) and ten hours of community service a year (helping out trophy wives at the school charity auction counts) you can read the incredibly biased wikipedia definition. It is factual, but the things that are considered great and prestigious really aren't. The newspaper wins awards because it's shiny and worked on very hard and only a few are released per year, and the yearbook encompasses the lower, junior, middle, and upper school. (they don't like using normal words) The vast majority of the faculty is prissy and uncool, although two teachers are rumored to have smoked pot with students in the past, and other such exceptions exist. The sports are okay, but are still only division 2. Students are frequently forced to sit through grueling assemblies by anyone who walks by or just because the faculty feels like discussing respect or a moral quality. Some examples are an off broadway show that wanted to use the expensive performing arts center and did a show for the students about immigrants with bad songs and singing that everyone fell asleep during and was reprimanded for.

Students of this school should not be given a hard time because of what they have to go through. This school gives out more homework than any school in the area, and thanks to that, it's very hard to focus on very much else. Students are driven mad by the amount of work and studying, and the strict system the school is run by makes it even harder. No kid living in the state of Michigan is really allowed to complain about school work unless they are attending Detroit Country Day and if you get nothing out of this definition all you really need to know is Detroit Country Day=lots of studying and more stress than you can imagine.

p.s. The students wear adorable little uniforms with blazers and ties and the girls have to wear navy blue blazers and a dcds tie and a grey skirt for color day (ironically named) and usually wear blue knee socks. Since there's no rules on shoes or jewelry and such, girls do tend to go over the top. Casual days come rarely and are usually only given as rewards. The student body does have some interesting characters that manage to be entertaining and persevere. You have to give them bonus points for surviving.
person:That kid goes to Detroit Country Day
other person: Oh, that kid has a lot of homework
by an alumni August 15, 2006