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3 definitions by Julian 'the Turk' Hasan

 
1.
Contrary to popular belief (and in some cases propaganda), Cyprus has been a Greek and Turkish island since the Ottoman Empire conquered it from the Venetians in 1571. Hell, you could even call the people there Cypriots. It is an independent, sovereign, nation; not an island 'belonging' to Greece or Turkey. Cyprus is an island that was never meant to be divided... What happened there is a truly horrible occurence in modern history.
TIMELINE OF THE ONGOING CONFLICT
(mostly of the ignored Turkish Cypriot view)

#1 Firstly, you must understand that Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots have a different language, religion, and culture and there has never been a single Cypriot identity.

#2 The Ottoman Empire conquered the island in 1571. The Turkish and Greek Cypriots, who were the two main ethnically distinct communities on the island, both flourished independently under Ottoman rule.

#3 In 1878 the Ottoman Government handed over the administration of Cyprus to Britain, whilst retaining its sovereignty of the island. This period saw the first major British involvement in the affairs of Cyprus, and it is around this time that the present day problems began.

#4 The British annexed the island after 1914 and discrimination against the Turkish Cypriots began in earnest. This period was marked by a major agitation by Greek Cypriots for Enosis (the Union of Cyprus with Greece), and under the indifference of the British, Turkish Cypriots were treated by the Greek Cypriots as inferior second class citizens in their own country.

#5 In 1960 together with a Treaty of Guarantee backed by Britain, Turkey and Greece, Cyprus gained its independence and a Constitution was formed, which recognised a joint and equal partnership between the two communities. The Greek Cypriots however were determined to overthrow the newly independent Republic of Cyprus from the very outset.

#6 In December 1963, the Greek Cypriots launched the Akritas plan with a series of co-ordinated attacks on Turkish Cypriots throughout the island. The aim of the plan was to terrorise Turkish Cypriots into accepting minority status. The Turkish Cypriots were forced to live in barricaded and armed enclaves for their own security and endured inhuman blockades.

#7 The present Cyprus situation was effectively sealed when on 4 March 1964 the United Nations, against the 1960 Treaty and Constitution, accepted a government solely formed by Greek Cypriots as the legitimate government of the Republic of Cyprus. Turkish Cypriots were ejected from all positions of Government, and were subjected to repeated violence and great hardships until 1974.

#8 On 15 July 1974, the Greek Cypriot Government led by Archbishop Makarios was deposed by a terrorist organisation EOKA-B and the Greek army, who declared Enosis (Union with Greece) and began to attack and kill Turkish Cypriots with a renewed vigour. Turkey intervened on 20 July 1974 following appeals by the Turkish Cypriot community and the deposed Archbishop Makarios, who pleaded at the UN for one of the other two Guarantor Powers to rescue Cyprus and its people, as required by The 1960 Treaty of Guarantee. In doing so, Turkey created a safe haven for the Turkish Cypriots in the north of the island. Turkish Cypriots felt safe for the first time since 1963.

#9 From this point the Turkish Cypriots tried to negotiate a political settlement with the Greek Cypriots, applying the principles of the 1960 Constitution to a bi-zonal, bi-communal federal solution. The failure of numerous UN-sponsored talks between the two sides eventually led to the declaration of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in 1983. Yet this did not resolve the Cyprus situation as only the Greek Cypriot state in South Cyprus received international recognition.

#10 Turkish Cypriots have become isolated politically, socially and economically since the events of 1964. The Greek Cypriots have erroneously been treated as the sole Government and administrators for the island, and have gained all the benefits that come with being accepted and integrated within the family of nations.

#11 From 2001 the United Nations began more intensely to address the "Cyprus Question". The new initiative culminated in two separate simultaneous referenda on The Annan Plan on 24 April 2004 in North and South Cyprus, which was formulated after protracted negotiations with both sides as well as with Greece and Turkey. The plan was approved by 65% of the Turkish Cypriots, whereas 76% of the Greek Cypriots rejected it.
by Julian 'the Turk' Hasan June 29, 2006
116 101
 
2.
There are Turkish Cypriots and there are Greek Cypriots.

Most Turkish Cypriots began coming to Cyprus in 1571; thus, it is not justified to chastice them for using the term 'Cypriot' when they have been on the island for over 400 years. It is true that post-1974 Turks (Anatolian settlers) are around, but it would be ignorant to say that authentic Turkish Cypriots have 'ceased to exist' because of this. Anyway, many Turks and Turkish Cypriots have intermarried as well, and their children were born on Cyprus, making them just as Cypriot as anyone else in my book.

Greek Cyprus's population isn't pure Greek Cypriot either. Saying that a third of the island does not exist will not solve anything.

It is also impossible to ignore that Cypriot culture has been heavily influenced by the Ottoman era. Thus, the 'Cypriots' mentioned in the definitions above or below (Greek and Turk alike) indulge themselves on Turkish coffee, eat dolma (dolmades), meza (mezades), etc. The only major difference between Greek and Turkish Cypriots is, in fact, their respective religions and allegances to mother countries such as Greece and Turkey.

I am an authentic Turkish Cypriot and when I hear a Greek Cypriot say I do not exist I am filled with inmeasurable pride for who I am. You can say I don't exist, but you can't take that pride away.
The Greek Cypriot buffer zone guard grins and asks, "Are you Turkish?"

The man smiles and responds, "I am Cypriot."
by Julian 'the Turk' Hasan June 29, 2006
109 135
 
3.
Contrary to popular belief (and in some cases propaganda), Cyprus has been a Greek and Turkish island since the Ottoman Empire conquered it from the Venetians in 1571. Hell, you could even call the people there Cypriots. It is an independent, sovereign, nation; not an island 'belonging' to Greece or Turkey. Cyprus is an island that was never meant to be divided... What happened there is a truly horrible occurence in modern history.
TIMELINE OF THE ONGOING CONFLICT
(mostly of the ignored Turkish Cypriot view)

#1 Firstly, you must understand that Turkish Cypriots and Greek Cypriots have a different language, religion, and culture and there has never been a single Cypriot identity.

#2 The Ottoman Empire conquered the island in 1571. The Turkish and Greek Cypriots, who were the two main ethnically distinct communities on the island, both flourished independently under Ottoman rule.

#3 In 1878 the Ottoman Government handed over the administration of Cyprus to Britain, whilst retaining its sovereignty of the island. This period saw the first major British involvement in the affairs of Cyprus, and it is around this time that the present day problems began.

#4 The British annexed the island after 1914 and discrimination against the Turkish Cypriots began in earnest. This period was marked by a major agitation by Greek Cypriots for Enosis (the Union of Cyprus with Greece), and under the indifference of the British, Turkish Cypriots were treated by the Greek Cypriots as inferior second class citizens in their own country.

#5 In 1960 together with a Treaty of Guarantee backed by Britain, Turkey and Greece, Cyprus gained its independence and a Constitution was formed, which recognised a joint and equal partnership between the two communities. The Greek Cypriots however were determined to overthrow the newly independent Republic of Cyprus from the very outset.

#6 In December 1963, the Greek Cypriots launched the Akritas plan with a series of co-ordinated attacks on Turkish Cypriots throughout the island. The aim of the plan was to terrorise Turkish Cypriots into accepting minority status. The Turkish Cypriots were forced to live in barricaded and armed enclaves for their own security and endured inhuman blockades.

#7 The present Cyprus situation was effectively sealed when on 4 March 1964 the United Nations, against the 1960 Treaty and Constitution, accepted a government solely formed by Greek Cypriots as the legitimate government of the Republic of Cyprus. Turkish Cypriots were ejected from all positions of Government, and were subjected to repeated violence and great hardships until 1974.

#8 On 15 July 1974, the Greek Cypriot Government led by Archbishop Makarios was deposed by a terrorist organisation EOKA-B and the Greek army, who declared Enosis (Union with Greece) and began to attack and kill Turkish Cypriots with a renewed vigour. Turkey intervened on 20 July 1974 following appeals by the Turkish Cypriot community and the deposed Archbishop Makarios, who pleaded at the UN for one of the other two Guarantor Powers to rescue Cyprus and its people, as required by The 1960 Treaty of Guarantee. In doing so, Turkey created a safe haven for the Turkish Cypriots in the north of the island. Turkish Cypriots felt safe for the first time since 1963.

#9 From this point the Turkish Cypriots tried to negotiate a political settlement with the Greek Cypriots, applying the principles of the 1960 Constitution to a bi-zonal, bi-communal federal solution. The failure of numerous UN-sponsored talks between the two sides eventually led to the declaration of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus in 1983. Yet this did not resolve the Cyprus situation as only the Greek Cypriot state in South Cyprus received international recognition.

#10 Turkish Cypriots have become isolated politically, socially and economically since the events of 1964. The Greek Cypriots have erroneously been treated as the sole Government and administrators for the island, and have gained all the benefits that come with being accepted and integrated within the family of nations.

#11 From 2001 the United Nations began more intensely to address the "Cyprus Question". The new initiative culminated in two separate simultaneous referenda on The Annan Plan on 24 April 2004 in North and South Cyprus, which was formulated after protracted negotiations with both sides as well as with Greece and Turkey. The plan was approved by 65% of the Turkish Cypriots, whereas 76% of the Greek Cypriots rejected it.
by Julian 'the Turk' Hasan June 26, 2006
124 184