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9 definitions by Christopher G. Zizzo

 
1.
Literally: "It's the war!"

This French phrase of resignation gained widespread use during World War II. It provided the universal excuse for everything that was broken, no longer functioned, was unavailable or could not be accomplished. It also explained away all unusual behavior. That it is in the language of a nation whose life and joie de vivre was being crushed by an occupational army gives it an aroused sensibility.

The phrase lingered into European reconstruction and then into modern times in all nations. It is spoken with a wry acknowledgement of its former literal meaning even though it may currently describe any other interfering force preventing accomplishment of a task, even laziness.
Jacques: "Renee gave herself to some soldiers for a bar of chocolate and a pair of silk stockings. What a slut!"
Pierre: "No, no, she's a good girl. C'est la guerre!"

Howard: "Traffic has become so tied up every day that I have to allow an additional hour to get to the city."
Jimmy: "That's life in the big city, C'est la guerre."
by Christopher G. Zizzo November 05, 2006
 
2.
Bravo and Sierra are two of the military's words used to prevent misunderstandings in radio transmission. They stand for the letters B and S in the same way that Alpha means A and X-Ray means X.

Using "I call bravo sierra" is a more articulate and less crude way of saying "I call bullshit". It also can be a coded way of letting your friends know what you think while keeping the clueless out of the circle.

The phrase has been popularized by the XM Satellite radio team of Opie & Anthony.
Herbert: "I graduated Princeton with a 4.0 cumulative average."
Jimmy: "Did ya? I call bravo sierra."
by Christopher G. Zizzo October 14, 2006
 
3.
Something bad happened, someone is going to get blamed and suffer the consequences of the act. Righteously, it should be the person who planned it, but, everything is negotiable. Someone else goes to jail, and in return, he is owed a favor. Or maybe, he just gets set up. This 1940's film noir gangster term is finding a new cachet.
You shot him brother so don't look at me like that. I'm not gonna take the fall for you.
by Christopher G. Zizzo September 13, 2006
 
4.
It simply asks the question, "Did you actually do that?", however, it drips with sarcastic disbelief or belittlement.
Alternates are "Do ya?" or "Will ya?"
Henry: "I've given up drinking."
Jimmy: "Did ya? I'll buy you a beer at Mulligan's and you can tell me all about it."

Horace: "I have an IQ of 133."
Jimmy: "Do ya? Then why is your shirt on backwards, stupid. Ha, you looked."

Headley: "When I die, I'm going to have my remains cremated and compressed into a diamond!"
Jimmy: "Will ya? It looks like the process has already started on your head, precious."
by Christopher G. Zizzo October 14, 2006
 
5.
When the wolf is at your door, such as: the IRS, the cops, or your bookie's leg-breaker, you will want to suggest an alternate target, such as: your partner, your dealer or another patsy who can take your punishment instead of you. Sometimes whole groups will find a fall guy to cover their crimes.
Throw to the wolves:
Once the triangulation of fire cut down the president, the FBI threw Oswald to the wolves.
by Christopher G. Zizzo June 08, 2006
 
6.
1. Another word for a bus, a passenger vehicle which carries many people.
2. A metaphor for society, which, like a bus, carries diverse people on their way to many destinations. This was the intent and meaning of the title of the television show "Omnibus", which told the stories of these people.
1.) The word bus comes from the name of the horse drawn cart known as an omnibus. When it got an engine, it became an autobus. Then the name was shortened.
2.) This melting pot nation is an omnibus of the world's people.
by Christopher G. Zizzo September 13, 2006
 
7.
Drinking Beer. Gone are the days of the church key (opener). Most beer bottles use twist-off caps for your convenience in getting to the brew without a fuss.
Just hangin' at the bar, twisting off a few long-necks, and watchin' the game.
by Christopher G. Zizzo November 12, 2006