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1.
a trailer for a video game or movie that offers little in plot, chracters, actors (in the case of movies) or gameplay (in the case of video games). teaser trailers are usually released about a year and a half to two years before the final product is released.
The Sly 4 teaser trailer did little more than confirm its existence. Good enough for me.
by wpk914 January 16, 2011
 
2.
A short game or movie trailer about thirty seconds long that shows little to nothing about what it's for, hence the word teaser. Typically, teaser trailers are release close to or along side the announcement of a new game/movie.
I can't wait for more info on the next Pixar movie! Too bad that teaser trailer only showed a toy space man and cowboy trying to 1-up one another though.
by BZKlint July 26, 2009
 
3.
adj/noun; a marketing tool used by corporations and organizations that have much more money than they are really worth to promote a product that is not as good as said tool. Hence, "teaser" is used in this sense to trick the unknowing angst-filled i-don't-know-who-i-am-yet consumer that there is a world out there where everything is roses, deep romantic kisses, and a stack of perfect pancakes floating on a pool of maple syrup flowing directly from the tree. "Trailer" the piece of toilet paper stuck to one's foot when leaving the restroom to notify the world that they have just stepped on a floor that is riddled with the same thing this is movie is filled with...
"Watch now! Teaser Trailer for Twilight 6!"
by Francis Grendelslayer March 12, 2010
 
4.
n.

1. A short trailer used to advertise an upcoming film, television program, video game or similar, usually released long in advance of the product, so as to "tease" the audience. Unlike typical theatrical trailers, they’re usually very short in length (between 30–60 seconds) and usually contain little, if any, actual footage from the film.

Teaser trailers are often made while the film is still in production or being edited and as a result they may feature scenes or alternate versions of scenes that are not in the finished film. Other ones (notably Pixar films) have scenes made for use in the trailer only, while sometimes, it is merely a truncated version of a theatrical trailer. Their purpose is less to tell the audience about a movie's content than simply to let them know that the movie is coming up in the near future, and to add to the hype of the upcoming release. Teaser trailers today are increasingly focused on internet downloading and the convention circuit.

See also, Teaser campaign.
Cloverfield, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the newer Star Wars films, and The Ring, are all examples of major motion picture events that used teaser trailers to gain hype.
by Jrskow July 15, 2011