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6.
Prounciation: "Ruu-skee"
Term coined during the Crimean War. Popularized my America during the cold war as a derogatory term.
"Nuke those damn Ruskies."
by Beast_Man January 17, 2007
 
1.
(n.) One of Russian nationality, extended sometimes to include former soviet union states such as the Ukraine
Contrary to what some people think, the word 'ruskie' or 'rusky' was not coined during the cold war, but the crimean war in which the Ottomans fought Russia, later joined by France and the United Kingdom.


Fun fact: The Crimean campaign was the only war France won in the 19th century; the beggining of the french military victories joke
by Kung-fu Jesus July 17, 2004
 
2.
A Russian person. A person of Russian descent.

The term is affectionate, not disparaging.
Igor the Ruskie is coming over to play chess this afternoon. Would you like a game with him.
by Tuna Wanda May 14, 2005
 
3.
(n) plural. Means Russian nation in Russian language. Russkie = Russian people = Russians.
Ruskie zhivut v Rossii = Russians live in Russia :)
by Venera April 25, 2007
 
4.
Ruskie is the commonly used nickname for the game known as RUSSIAN, or RUSSIAN BERUIT. This game, lovingly referred to as the Game of the Gods, involves ten 16 ounce cups set up Beruit style on each side of a standard Beruit table. The cups are then completely filled with beer; this results in upwards of about 15.5 beers per side.
The game is the similar to standard Beruit only in the shooting aspect. Once a cup has been hit, a player on that side has one minute to consume the cup of beer. If he fails to do so or vomits while doing so, he will lose his next turn. He will have a minute before his next takeable turn to finish the remainder of his beer; if he fails to do so or vomits the vicious cycle continues.
Once a cup has been made, the second shooter can take his shot. If he is successful, his team has the ball returned for an additional round of shooting. This, often referred to as a BRINGBACK, is believed to be the greatest momentum changer in all of sport.
A team wins in a manner similar to normal Beruit, with one key difference; if a player vomits or fails to finish his beer before a rebuttal shot, he only has the opportunity to shoot one rebuttal shot, regardless of whether or not he makes it or how many cups are on the table.
Vomiting is considered a sign of weakness in this game. If a player vomits too much and removes himself from the game, commonly known as "walking off the Ruskie table", he receives an indefinite suspension from competition.
Losing is something that teams need to accept in this game; if a team plays a great number of games it most likely will lose a decent amount of them. The game is a war of attrition and rarely does one side dominate over the long run. This is why teams with less than 15 games' experience are not considered legitimate in terms of their overall record. A team that has played 20 games is legitmate, and a team that has played 30 games should expect to lose at least somewhere around 15, with a few draws.
As it has picked up steam, Ruskie has been described as the Greatest Spectator Sport Known to Man, filled with entertainment, suspense, and intense competition. A Ruskie Tournament of Champions is tentatively scheduled for Fall of 2007.
A great example of true Ruskie, on the highest stage, took place at an outdoor fraternity party in September of 2006. The 4 greatest ambassadors of the game played twice, splitting the two games in front of record crowds. Experts feel that a torch was passed that night, from one generation to the next.
by C-Muff August 07, 2007
 
5.
plural. Russian people. From the russian word "rus-ki-e", pronouced by americans as "rus-kee", also used as a sing. nown in English. Used as a derogatory word by Americans. Also used in Polish, and other Slavic languages, but without any derogatory meaning. From Rus' the ancient name for Russia. Lit. people of Rus', Russia.
He's a Ruskie.
by Russkij June 22, 2003
 
7.
Otherwise known as a ushanka, it is the type of hat worn by people in Russia and the former Soviet Republics. When worn with the sides down, it resembles the hat worn by Kyle Broflovski.
Man, if you're going to Russia, you'd better get a ruskie or you're gonna get picked up by the KGB.
by VladimirPoonHandler January 11, 2010