Runcible is a word coined by Edward Lear in the late 1800's. It doesn't mean anything, but it has a rough, crunchy sound so it can be used to describe anything bad. The verb form is "to runcibate."
"I had a runcible time at the dentist's." and, "Stop runcibating, you're driving me crazy."
by cyberpageman February 08, 2010
In the poem, "The Owl and the Pussycat", based on an Edward Lear poem, a runcible spoon is used to eat fruit. It is shaped much like what we now call a "spork".
"They dined on mince, and slices of quince, which they ate with a runcible spoon.
by Travis T. (linzi) August 23, 2004
Edward Lear's neologism referring to cats, hats and spoons. Later used to describe a spoon with tongs.
They ate with a runcible spoon.
by r titus April 05, 2006
A type of spoon, similar to a tablespoon - but with a much longer curved handle
I can't reach the olives at the bottom of this jar!

There's a runcible spoon in the drawer - use that instead
by David Harris March 20, 2004

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