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14.
Reggaeton (also spelled Regueton or with an accent) is a Latin style of music. Reggaeton is Panamanian, but has grown to be more associated with "Boricuas" (Puerto Ricans), some claiming the genre as their own. It is characterized by a certain beat called "dem bow", which is a traditional Carribean beat but was first popularized by dancehall musician Shabba Ranks's song with a title of the same name. An example of the beat can be heard on that song or simply defined as A-A-B (or ch-ch-bass) or B-B-A (bass, bass, ch). Its influences include Hip hop, techno and Reggae dancehall, and touches of merengue, salsa, bachata, bolero and other Latin music can be featured. Unlike reggae, it does not use "riddims", instrumentals created by producers who can be used by any artists, most of the time, but exceptions can be made, such as Deejay Sasha and Ivy Queen's "Dat Sexy Body", which uses the Bookshelf Riddim originating from Reggae dancehall artist Beenie Man.

After Raggamuffin (dancehall) deejays from Panama including El General and Black Apache experimented with the same beat, they began "toasting" over it (a kind of Jamaican-style rapping which occurs when talking, rhyming, or singing is done over a beat) in Spanish. It further transformed with the likes of Don Chezina, Vico C, Las Guanabanas, DJ Blass, DJ Playero, and other Puerto ricans and Dominicans who discovered this then-emerging genre, and began rapping instead of toasting.

Singles from the next millenium broke Reggaeton into the mainstream music scene, such as Panamanian rapper Lorna's "Papi Chulo (Te Traigo el Mmm)" and half- Puerto Rican N.O.R.E. (also known Noreaga)'s "Oye Mi Canto" (featuring Nina sky, Daddy Yankee, and Gemstar and Big Mato).

Finally, Daddy Yankee's tremendously successful song "Gasolina" (written by Eddie Dee and produced by Luny Tunes) reached #1 in the United States Latin music charts, and then gained huge acclaim in Colombia, Mexico, Italy, France, the UK, and Germany.

At various stages, Reggaeton has been known as "Musica underground", "Dembow", "Spanish dancehall", or "Reggae en espanol", but was then finally known as its current name in the early 2000s.

Related genres similar to reggaeton include Salsaton, Merenhouse, Bachateo, and Bhangraton. Reggaeton is like, but not synonymous to, Latin rap. This is because Latin rap defines any rap recorded by artists of Hispanic or Spanish-speaking descent who rap in either Spanish, English or both, where reggaeton has specific influences and is mainly classified by the previously stated Dembow beat.

Today, Reggaeton has gained popularity and is being much experimented with throughout Latin America, especially in countries like Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Unfortunately, it is one of the most plagiarized genres in the music industry.

Some prominent reggaeton artists and producers or artists that have experimented with the genre (not listed in sequence of importance) include Daddy Yankee, Wisin and Yandel, Tego Calderon, Calle 13, Bimbo, Nicky Jam, Luny Tunes, Don Omar, Eliel, Pescozada, El Chombo, Ariel, Casper, DJ Playero, Don Miguelo, Kartier, Tony Dize, El Rubiote, Franco "El Gorilla", El Sensei, Rafy Mercenario, Rakim y Ken-y, Cheka, Yomo, Naldo, Lito y Polaco, Zion y Lennox, Voltio, Hector El Father, Tito El Bambino, Trebol Clan, Ingco Crew, Baby Rasta, Gringo, Arcangel, Tainy, Plan B, Alexis y Fido, John Eric, El General, Lorna, Killer Ranks, Wise, Big Boy, Eddie Dee, Angel y Khriz, Tony Dize, Johnny Prez, Fulanito, Gem star and Big Mato, Vico C, Ivy Queen, Tony Touch, Don Chezina, El General, D'Mingo, Heavy Clan, DJ Pollo, Magnate and Valentino, Baby Ranks, Sasha, Speedy, La Sista, and others.
Reggaeton can be heard on songs such as:

"Gasolina"
"Chulin Culin Chunfly"
"Dile"
"Oye Mi Canto"
"Quiero Bailar"
"Papi Chulo"
"Rakata"
"Dat Sexy Body"
"Reggaeton Latino"
"Papi te Quiero"
"Cuando Baila Reggaeton"
"Que Se Tiren"
"Pa' Que Retozen"
"Para Mi Barrio (Reggaeton Mix)"
"Con Rabia"
"A Que No a Treves"
"Tra Tra Tra"
"Lo Que Paso Paso"
"Dejala Volar"
"Caramelo"
"Ella no te quiere"
"Cuerpo a Cuerpo"
"Ponte de Pie"
"Eso Ehh...!"
"Verme"
"El Telefono"

Keep in mind that these are only some of the songs that give a good example.

Some albums that mostly feature reggaeton include:

Daddy Yankee's "Barrio Fino" (or the live version, Barrio Fino en Directo")
Don Omar's "The Last Don"
Ivy Queen's "Diva"
Don Chezina's "Reggaeton Revolucion"
Luny Tunes's "King of the Beats", "Mas Flow: The Beginning", "Mas Flow 2", "Mas Flow 2.5", and "Mas Flow: Los Benjamins", which feature other reggaeton artists
Heavy Clan's "Cuerpo a Cuerpo"
Hector El Father's "The Bad Boy"
Tito el Bambino's "Top of the Line"
Rakim and Ken-y's "Masterpiece"
Wisin and Yandel's "Pa'l Mundo", and "Wisin y Yandel Presentan: Los Vaqueros"
Andy Montanez's "Salsaton: Salsa con Reggaeton"
Alexis and Fido's "The Pitbulls"
Voltio's self titled album, "Voltio"
Baby Rasta y Gringo's "Sentenciados"

Some (only some) Reggaeton compilations are:

"Sangre Nueva (Special Edition)"
"Los Rompe Discotekas"
"Gargolas-The Next Generation"
"Abusando del Genero"
"Reggaeton Hitmakers"
"Reggaeton Fury"
"Chosen Few: El Documental"
"100% Dominicano: La Nueva Sangre del Reggaeton"
"Dancehall Reggaespanol" (shows a more primitive form of Reggaeton)

Some Reggaeton record labels are:
Machete Music
Buddha's Family
Pina Records
Sangre Nueva Music
El Cartel Records
RB Entertainmet
Alex Music
Tommy Boy Entertainment
Don Ricardo Garcia international
by Gringostyle January 05, 2007
87 41
 
1.
Reggaeton is characterized by rough, monotone rapping (in Spanish) and driving dancehall riddims, and it's rapidly becoming the dance music of choice for a generation of young Latinos. While only recognized as a style in the 1990s, reggaeton has its roots in the '70s, when Jamaican workers moved to Panama to work on the canal and brought reggae music with them. Reggae's popularity grew in Central America and the Caribbean at the same time that American rap was finding its way south. The landmark development came in 1985, when Vico C released Puerto Rico's first Spanish-language rap album. It was only a matter of time before producers linked Latin rap with Jamaica's hard dancehall sounds. All they needed was to add a few native Puerto Rican touches like the bomba and plena rhythms (better known from salsa), and presto: a new genre. Reggaeton finally spilled over Puerto Rico's borders in the 21st century, as artists like Tego Calderon, Don Omar, Ivy Queen and Hector y Tito gained currency abroad. Even boy bands like Aventura climbed aboard the bandwagon, emulating a defanged reggaeton and signaling the genre's growing appeal.
Reggaeton Artists: Daddy Yankee, Tito El Bambino, Don Omar, Calle 13, Don Chezina, El General, Hector y Tito, Ivy Queen, Rey Pirin, Vico C, Tego Calderon, Wisin y Yandel, Luny Tunes, Casa De Leones, Renato, Alexis y Fido, Angel y Khriz, Jowell y Randy, RKM y Ken-Y, Yaga y Mackie, Zion y Lennox, Nicky Jam, Franco El Gorilla, Plan B, Don Miguelo, O.G. Black
by Paul Wall Da People's Champ October 05, 2009
1352 349
 
2.
Reggaeton is a Puerto Rican based style of beats which was actually originated in Panama (El General). The beat then evolved from there and it is now cosidered a favorite music by Boricuas. The beat itself is simple and follows the following pattern: A A B...or Tap Tap Bass. Though most of the lyrics which modern-day reggaeton artist use sexist and repetative, some artists use it for love songs and to express how they feel about a special woman aka ]mami chula].
Some examples of reggaeton artists are:

Daddy Yankee
Nicky Jam
Eddie Dee
Johnny Prez

Smooth reggaeton artist who speak of love not sex, are:

Don Omar
Zion y Lennox
Many more
by David aka Jessica's Papi chulo October 27, 2004
722 305
 
3.
Reggaeton is the most popular music in Latin America, as well as a huge youth-based cultural phenomenon. It is not a form of Spanish Reggae, but instead an evolution of the modern Jamaican popular music, called dancehall. Upon listening to both dancehall and reggaeton songs, the similarity becomes obvious. Reggaeton also can draw influences from Merengue, Bachata, Salsa, Vallenato, and House, and combine these forms of music in a new and unique way. It is this mix of different styles found throughout latin america that continues to drive the music forward and keep it from becoming overly repetetive.

Reggaeton is based upon the "Dem-Bow" beat. Though many westerners may critique the music for hoving the same beat in every song, the fact is, this is the same as any form of latin music. Every salsa song has the same rhythm, as does every cumbia, every merengue, etc... Any music intended specifically for dancing, as reggaeton is, will always have the same beat to make it easier and more fun to dance to.

Also, though many reggaeton songs have explicit lyrics, this is only one form of the genre, called "Perreo," which is usually accompanied by a form of grinding which goes by the same name. However, there are other forms of reggaeton: "Bachateo" and "Romantico" are two of the most common, both typically based around love. Reggaeton can be danced fast, slow, in pairs, or even single.

Most reggaeton is based in Puerto Rico, but many productions also come out of the Dominican Republic, Colombia, Panama, and certain parts of the United States (most notably, New York City). The music is extremely popular throughout Latin America, though less so in Chile, Argentina, Uruguay, and Mexico.

Some famous reggaeton artists:

Daddy Yankee is the most famous artist at the moment. His huge hit "Gasolina," was followed by songs such as "Lo Que Paso Paso", "Rompe", "Machucando", and "Mirame." Most of his songs are in the perreo style.

Don Omar sings more emotional songs, often in the "bachateo" style. Some hits are "Pobre Diabla", "Reggaeton Latino", "Dale don Dale", and "Cuentale."

Other famous artists include Wisin y Yandel, Tego Calderon, Zion y Lennox, Tito el Bambino, Hector el Father, Calle 13, Vico C, Ivy Queen, Khriz y Angel, and Rakim y Ken-Y.
by Callejero July 29, 2006
324 173
 
4.
Probably the worst so-called 'music' on the planet right now (even worse than country).

It's seriously fucking annoying and if you live here in Miami, you'd know what I mean as that reggaeton shit is everywhere, pumping out of stupid clubs or being played way too loud by Daddy Yankee-wannabe pickup truck driving pricks who like to 'Ride It Like A Ford'.

Reggaeton has the same beat and all songs sound exactly the same (awful). The lyrics are horrible and are derogatory to women. Reggaetons dress like gangsters, but they're not -- they're just no-talent losers.

I have never understood why it's called 'reggaeton' either because it sounds nothing like reggae.

Reggae = Good
Reggaeton = Bad

People who listen to reggaeton should be given a good kicking until they learn to appreciate REAL music, not a fucking noise with some Puerto Rican asshole singing badly to a repetitive beat.
One of the more popular reggaeton songs:

"Gasolina" by Daddy Yankee

A ella le gusta la gasolina
(Dame mas gasolina!)
Como le encanta la gasolina
(Dame mas gasolina!)
A ella le gusta la gasolina
(Dame mas gasolina!)
Como le encanta la gasolina
(Dame mas gasolina!)
by ihatereggaeton May 28, 2006
667 533
 
5.
Puertorican version of reggae, usually is like a gangsta version of reggae. For people that know something in music, know that original reggae from Jamaica and Reggaeton from Puerto Rico are very dissimilar in sound and instruments used
El party de reggaeton es mañana.

Tomorrow we have a reggaeton party
by BigmacX July 08, 2004
449 319
 
6.
Reggaeton is a noise produced by combining some annoying pre-recorded rhythms from a cheap electronic keyboard and the lyrics that come out from your sexually active daughter's diary. To gain respect and to make up for their retarded music skills they act and dress up like rap artists. I rather live next to a noisy airport runway than listen to this horrible thing. I love hip hop rap any latin music rock african arabic anything you name it except this retarded reggaeton.
reggaeton "song" la gasolina.
daddy yankee
dady jerky
don omar
don ramo
by JORGEAG April 27, 2006
461 348
 
7.
Annoying noise made in Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic that has spread thru all Latin America, making teenagers think that women are sexual objects. Popular for its vulgar, idiotic , sexist and sexual lyrics, its two-beat constant repetition and the perreo, one way of simulating coitus with your clothes on. Nothing to do with reggae.
(Spanish) Vamos por las girlas para ir a Pananena's a perrear reggaeton
(english) Let's get our bitches so we go Perrear reggaeton at pananena's
by Seb Cameltoe April 06, 2006
390 299