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8.
noun. verb. adverb. all of the above; (pronounced POHG)A derogatory elitist term/acronym originating in Ireland but severely outdated and used by such entities as the US Marine Corp, US Navy, US Army Infantry(11B) to elevate soldier, marine, sailor to an otherwise irrelevant position in order to (IOT) sound somehow superior to said party IOT make soldier sailor marine feel better about his stupid choice of being a grunt instead of Civil Affairs or PSYOP. Also, in some circles, such as Fort Bragg, NC used synonomously with the word LEG. see LEG non-airborne qualified FOBbit REMF
How dare you walk on my Airborne Infantry maroon beret(in some cases, Green Beret) land you Pogue!
by civilianindisguise July 18, 2010
 
1.
Derogatory phrase used by front-line infantry units to describe rear-support or staff units.
Screw those leg-ass pogues!
by Hu$tla' $teve August 26, 2003
 
2.
Derogatory military slang used by front line troops to describe staff and other rear echelon or support units/troops
Buggerd pogue and his chief of staff. No I aint seen then out here busting there arse.
by Finn April 14, 2005
 
3.
.Orininally P.O.G ( Personnel other than Grunts). There are two types of pogues:

1) field pogues: These are the ones that give support to the grunts(infantry) in the field, like communications and transport.

2) office pogues: These are the office troops that sit on their arses in front of a computer with heat in the winter and ac in the summer. Also known as S.O.M.A ( sit on my arse). These are looked down by both, grunts and field pogues.

Field pogues sometimes become grunts because they go everywhere the grunts go, like the the Navy Corpsman or Marine Radio Operator.
" Do you have a combat action ribbon? you f*ing pogue !!
by gigantus March 11, 2006
 
4.
US Army slang, a derogatory name for a non-combat soldier. The term carries with it an implication of unmanliness, homosexuality, even paedophilia, since Hershey bars and other types of candy are known as ‘pogue bait’, illustrating the contempt of the combat soldier for any kind of REMF.
Derived from the Gaelic 'Póg' meaning arse it possibly came to be used originally by American troops of Irish descent but quickly became widespread. In Gaelic one use of the word would be in the phrase ‘Póg mo thóin’ (pronounced pogue mahone) meaning 'kiss my arse'.
That swish REMF from Headquarters is stockin' up on pogue bait again.

That pogue ground pounder wrote me up when he caught me takin' a hit of some Cambodian!
by Croatalin November 22, 2013
 
5.
A pogue is what infantrymen call non-infantrymen in the US Army. Marines probably use the same word, though I can't comment on that.

"Pogue" is generally disparaging, though the degree of vitriol with which one uses it can vary. The connotation associated with pogue is that the person is lazy and/or soft, and therefore selected a job in the military that doesn't involve the grueling field training that infantrymen must endure. Pogues are not deserving of respect.

A pogue is similar to a R.E.M.F. (Rear echelon motherfucker). Rear echelon means far away from the fight, "in the rear with the gear." Nearly all R.E.M.F.'s are pogues, though not all pogues are R.E.M.F.'s.

"Pogue" is not synonymous with "leg." A leg is what airborne troops call non-airborne troops. Plenty of infantrymen are not airborne-qualified, and are therefore legs, but not pogues. And a pogue can be airborne qualified, and therefore not a leg.
"Hey Jones, we're putting you in Headquarters platoon. Go hang out in the supply room with those 92Y pogues."
by The Torch May 29, 2012
 
6.
Generally used to describe someone who is asserting to be something more than they really exist to be.
They might be a U.S. Marine, but this person works in an office and is not an actual field Marine; Office Pogue.

A person who is in the Marching Band and thinks he/she is cool doing it; Band Pogue.
by Thom_A November 07, 2006
 
7.
Gaelic for 'KISS MY ARSE'.

slang term for a person of Irish descent.

the name of a great band, The Pogues, who wrote songs like 'A Pair of Brown Eyes', 'The Sick Bed of Cuchulainn', etc.
"Get that Pogue out of here, he's had enough to drink."
by McNabb January 30, 2007