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1.
Being either afraid of the cold or feeling the cold a lot. Used across the Midlands of England and the north
"You nesh git, you don't need a coat."
by KerrAvon October 10, 2003
 
2.
Somewhone who is always cold, even when it isnt!

(It's sort of a Yorkshire thing)


"I'm cold!"
"It's not cold! You're nesh!"
by Dee Davison February 02, 2008
 
3.
Definitely used outside Sheffield: used in Lancashire,South Wales and read in teenage novel based in Wales during WWW II Let's bring this Old English/Celtic ? word back as it has a very explicit meaning and so should not be lost. Any more ideas? I will be very interested. BRING BACK NESH.
'Don't be nesh' to person complaining of feeling cold: used affectionately (?)
 
4.
Heard this a lot when i was a kid in mid-cheshire, probably still is heard a lot. Also used in Sheffield a lot I believe, so the term has an unusual west/east distribution, the pennine hills offering no resistance whatsoever to this one!
Used quite critically and as mild verbal ubuse towards someone who feels the cold easily, like's their comfort, and is a lazy good-for-nothing - the suggestion is, therefore, they must be a 'puffter' or even worse . .
Heard in the depths of mid-winter; & long dark walk ahead:

Bill: 'Comin' down to the shop lad?'

Alan: 'Nah, don't think I'll bother'

Bill: 'What's up with you, yer nesh b**tard!'
by blokerama May 08, 2009
 
5.
whimpish! I can't thnk of another word close enough. Our family, living on the Wirral, Cheshire in the 50's & 60's used it regularly and I have yet to come across anyone 'down south' who knows what it means
"Can I turn the heating up?"

"Oh don't be so nesh! Put a jumper on if you're cold".
by northerninexile October 06, 2009
 
6.
A word, often used in the English Midlands, to describe someone who seems to be almost constantly cold. Often used in conjunction with the word dead (as an adverb).
"Katie is dead nesh."
"That girl is nesh."
"I'm dead nesh."
by BoneBroken October 28, 2009
 
7.
A southern interpretation on the Sheffield meaning, which is used when something is good or cool.

The word originates from the miss communication when it was being transferred from the northern to southern dialects.
"Do you like my new trainers?

They are well nesh!"
by KrispieBrown July 25, 2011