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2.
1. Generic name for a butler, generally informal and rude.
2. Mascot of search engine ask.com

Both are derived from the fiction of P. G. Wodehouse, whose character Jeeves quickly became known as more than a mere butler but something of a hidden genius, for Jeeves had the answers to everything.
1. "Hey Jeeves, disappear! I've got some private buiness I need to attend to."

2. When his master enquires about newts, Jeeves responds,"Oh, yes, sir. The aquatic members of the family Salamandridae which
constitute the genus Molge." -from the novel Right Ho, Jeeves!
by sandi June 06, 2004
97 23
 
1.
Name of butler in any rich person's house.
If you name your son Jeeves, he will be doomed to a future of butlery.
by Bastardized Bottomburp June 06, 2003
218 75
 
3.
One of the two main characters of a series of books written by P.G. Wodehouse. Jeeves was a butler and veritable genius who got Bertie, his bumbling but well-meaning employer, out of trouble and inevitable misunderstandings.
Bertie: "So there you are. I'm on the horns of...what are those things you get on the horns of?"
Jeeves: "Dilemmas, sir."

(pg. 35, "Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves" 1963)
by anon September 15, 2003
62 14
 
4.
Man who tucks Bertie Wooster in at night
what-ho, Jeeves!
by ND April 23, 2004
66 20
 
5.
1. Person: Reginald Jeeves.

Arguably British novellist P.G. Wodehouse's most famous creation, Reginald Jeeves is the consummate Gentleman's Personal Gentleman. He serves as valet (not butler, mind you) to Bertram Wilberforce Wooster, a genial young member of the idle rich in fictional 1920's England. Jeeves is almost unnaturally competent, and his role in the books is to fish Bertie and his pals out of the many and various scrapes they get themselves into. This often involves getting Bertie un-engaged and sorting out troubles with uncles and aunts. So legendary is his brain (so large that his head sticks out in the back), that his help is often enlisted by Bertie's friends and relatives as well.

Jeeves is perpetually poised, and is portrayed by Bertie (who narrates the books) as an almost superhuman figure, 'gliding' and 'shimmering' in and out of rooms. His speech is convoluted yet precise, and he often quotes great works of literature to assist his point. He rarely shows any expression save a slight twitch of the mouth or a raise of the eyebrow, but to one well-versed in reading 'the Jeevesian dial' as Bertie would have it, he can be even more expressive than the most extroverted of people.

In the early nineties' ITV series 'Jeeves and Wooster,' he was portrayed (marvellously) by Stephen Fry, to Hugh Laurie's Bertie Wooster.

2. A stereotypical name often used in fiction for a male retainer of any variety, be he butler, valet, footman, chauffeur, etc. This springs, of course, from the Jeeves books.

3. Related- 'Jeevesian', adjective- as Jeeves would do. Eg: in the manner typical of a perfect servant, valet, or butler
'There are moments, Jeeves, when one asks oneself, "Do trousers matter?"'

‘The mood will pass, sir.’

~~~~~~
'But as I always say: Jeeves moves in mysterious ways, his wonders to perform.'

~~~~~~~

'Jeeves! Never had I been quite so glad to see the dependable black bowler hat and implacable phizog of my valet, and many times have I been glad to see the chap, he having extricated myself and many friends of self from uncountable sticky circs.'
by Culumacilinte October 10, 2007
51 7
 
6.
1. Name of Bertie Wooster's butler from P.G. Wodehouse's comedy Jeeves. This is maybe his most populer story.

In every book Bertie encounters a problem in his life, sometimes involving either his family or friends. Jeeves supports him with advice and help to get it off his chest.

Granada also aired it's own television series "Jeeves and Wooster", based off the book. Stephen Fry as Jeeves, and Hugh Laurie as Bertie. Both are actors in the Black-Adder series.

2. This is also a name for the butler stereotype. It sometimes honors Wodehouse's character as a namesake. An example is Ask Jeeves, the mascot of the internet search engine.
"There is one possible solution, sir"
by Anonymous November 21, 2004
39 9
 
7.
n.: (JEE-f.) british slang for "fool"; a nincompoop, an idiot.

v.: (JEE-f'd)displaying prominent foolishness.

proper noun: Jeefe McGibbons; a Welsh Hick. The epitome of jeefe-ness. The Town Goof could be described as a Jeefe McGibbons.
"You got that one wrong? You silly jeefe, you!!"

"Boy! I really jeef'd that one!"

"Jeefe McGibbons is such a... (for lack of better term) jeefe!"
by Gillian & Aleksandra April 08, 2008
4 0