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3.
1. n. a fictional monster appearing in the poem "Jabberwocky" by Lewis Carroll. In the poem, a "beamish boy" slays the Jabberwock by beheading it. The Jabberwock is described as having "eyes of flame", living in a "tulgey wood" and "whiffling" and "burbling" as as it moves. John Tenniel, the original illustrator of the poem, drew the Jabberwock as a bipedal anthropomorphic dragon creature with a long, bending neck, a sucker-like mouth with four comically large and flat incisors, two barbels and two antennae, a fringe of long white whiskers, large hairy talon-like hands (with a thumb and three fingers each) and humanlike feet (with three toes each), pupil- and iris-less eyes, two black wings, a long tail, and a waistcoat.

2. n. made-up words, such as those used by Lewis Carroll in the poem "Jabberwocky".

3. n. a text which exemplifies such made-up words, such as "Jabberwocky", "The Owl and the Pussycat", and everything by Dr. Seuss.

4. n. any nonsense or gibberish.
1) The creature is called a "Jabberwock", not a "Jabberwocky". Sorry, Tim Burton.

2) When I read Dr. Seuss I sometimes get confused by all the jabberwock.

3) "The Owl and the Pussycat", from which we have derive the word "runcible spoon", is a famous jabberwock.

4) Shut your jabberwock! I'm trying to study.
by tangles10 April 25, 2010
 
1.
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

“And, hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy.

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.

“Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!”

He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought—
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.

And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!

One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.

“And, hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!”
He chortled in his joy.

’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.
By Lewis Caroll
by Manxome June 29, 2003
 
2.
1. A manifestation of the deepest level of fear in the human psyche.
2. All of the things that one is afraid of that one can put no proper name to.
3. The name of Lewis Carroll's mmonster in The poem "Jabberwocky"; it appears only when Alice is afraid and once confronted, never appears again.
4.
"Beware the Jabberwock my son, the teeth that bite and claws that catch..."
by Eddie Williams November 01, 2003
 
4.
(JAH-ber-wock
n. A large, carnivorous medievil beast.
"Beware the jabberwock, my son!"

Comment submitted with request to Delete: "1. The jabberwocky is an IMAGINARY large carnivorous beast.
2. It's spelled MEDIEVAL.
3. The proposed definition also fits most contemporaneous Saxons, Huns, etc., and is therefore INdefinite."
by LD May 19, 2003