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1.
When 'going on the lash' is used in conversation, it calls to the speaker and listeners minds the intention of getting drunk or 'pissed'. This is done among friends, particularly close male ones. If we were to plot age with frequency of lashing we would see somewhat of a pictorial representation of the following: one rarely goes on the lash before age 10, a bit more before 18, spiking between 19-26. After this it steadily declines, all but disappearing by age 60.

Going on the lash is an activity that is considered fun for those participating, but not necessarily by its witnesses. Further, going on the lash is an event which is not defined by a singular moment but by a night (and, if you are adventurous, afternoon/night). We also see that this is an activity which is shared across all socio-economic backgrounds.

Going on the lash is culturally specific, and is most often used in the UK and Ireland. Going on the lash, however, is not confined to English speaking Europeans: rather, it should be considered as a variant of an age-old, universally graspable, activity. Looking at a specific example we see forms of activity that mimic certain features of the lash. For instance, the phrase in American English of 'getting after it' has a similar meaning, particularly with regards to the underlying intention of the speaker; alcohol's primary place, etc). However, this phrase (and these ideas) ultimately fail to entirely capture essence of the lash.
"The wife's out of town lads, how about we go on the lash?!" (29 year old construction worker).

"When these exams are done, we are certainly going on the lash!" (University undergraduate).

"While last night was indeed incredible, the hangover which ensues from going on the lash is getting harder and harder to endure" (33 year old office worker).

Ah, yes. I do indeed remember my times in Oxford fondly, particularly when we got after it. I mean, when we got to go on the lash. (American PhD student who spent time in the UK).
by chillingindeed March 12, 2011