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3.
Geechee commonly refers to a person of white descent whose family has long roots in the South Carolina lowcountry, mostly between Beaufort and Georgetown; centered around Charleston. They speak "Geechee" which is a heavily accented dialect of English with Gullah influences.
Beanyeah (Been here) = is the Geechee term for someone who has lived here all of their life and their family is also from here.
Cumyeah (Come hear)= is the Geechee term for someone who moved here recently (as in any time after they were born.)
Boat in Geechee is pronounced boe-at with two syllables.
by Benyeah November 27, 2007
390 395
 
1.
Geechee is another term for the Gullah people who live in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Georgia including both the coastal plain and the Sea Islands. They are Black/African Americans. The origin of the word have a few suggested sources...after the Ogeechee River near Savannah, Georgia; from Kissi, an ethnic group living in the border area between Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia or from a Creek Indian word. Because of geography, climate, and patterns of importation of enslaved Africans, the Gullah are known for preserving more of their African linguistic and cultural heritage than any other African-American community in the United States. The Lowcountry region was know for its rice production. African farmers from the "Rice Coast" brought skills for rice cultivation and the rice industry became very successful. Malaria and yellow fever kept many plantation owners away from the Lowcountry leaving their Black overseers in charge. The isolation from the mainland and little contact from whites fostered an environment where they developed a culture unique to America.
Geechee saying:
"Hunnuh mus tek cyare de root fa heal de tree."
by Bebe Doris February 09, 2010
306 204
 
2.
Geechee commonly refers to a person of white descent whose family has long roots in the South Carolina lowcountry, mostly between Beaufort and Georgetown; centered around Charleston. They speak "Geechee" which is a heavily accented dialect of English with Gullah influences.
Beanyeah (Been here) = is the Geechee term for someone who has lived here all of their life and their family is also from here.
Cumyeah (Come hear)= is the Geechee term for someone who moved here recently (as in any time after they were born.)
Boat in Geechee is pronounced boe-at with two syllables.
by Benyeah November 27, 2007
361 360
 
4.
Without too much of a history lesson, a Geechee or Geechie person is someone of a Gullah descent. Gullah is the mixture of the English and African languages, that was spoken by slaves who were required to learn English, but still didn't want the masters to know exactly what they were saying. However, unlike the Gullah link indicates, Gullah was actually widespread along the coast. It may have originated in Charleston, but there are many gullah civilizations located right in Beaufort, SC. The Geechee language is the derivative of Gullah, that has a creole, southern, and carribean twang to it. It still chops up the English language like Gullah, allowing someone to say more with less words, or eliminate excessive mouth movement.

The Geechee language plays a large part in the culture, which is better left for a definition to itself. The largest, active Geechee culture is located in Charleston, SC and it's surrounding areas. A fact many people don't know is that to be called Geechee was once viewed as a derogatory remark. Today it is a proud title embraced by Charlestonians and others alike, and celebrated through such festivals as Moja Arts and Spoleto. There also used to be a booth in the Northwoods Mall of N. Charleston, that sold the clothing line, Geechee Gear. More history can be discovered with a simple Google search. Although there's not enough people to make it a noticeable presence, the Geechee culture does stretch down the southern coast, touching Beaufort, SC, Savannah, GA, and other cities/towns down into Florida.

The most similar relation to a Geechee accent is that of the Caribbeans (though not nearly as strong) or New Orleans.
Quick Geechee/ie Lesson:

I is normally used instead of I'm:
I'm about to go to the store = "I gointada sto", which doesn't require any mouth movement whatsoever.

e = he/she/it/his/her
Ex. Ay, where the remote at? (I ain know where e at)
Ex. That girl still sleep wit e thumb in e mout.

nahIsayin (nye-sayin) = You know what I'm saying?
yah/chea = here
chern = children

Boy I hongry, boy = I'm hungry

The letter "i" is often pronounced as "u":
fifty cents becomes "fufty cent"

The letter "t" is often pronounced as "c":
down the screet, instead of "street"
Naw, I scraight = No thanks, I'm straight/alright

The pronounciation of the letter "a" is stressed:
"Boy go ahead" sounds like, "Boy go heaaaad, boy!"
"Get out my face" sounds like, "Get out my fay-ace, now!"
by JuiceMan January 23, 2008
237 336