The ancient Celtic language of Ireland, Scotland, and the Isle of Man before the English came along. The English tried to conquer those lands, also trying to wipe out the languages. Irish Gaelic (Gaeilge) is spoken mainly in areas along the western coast of Ireland. Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is spoken mostly in the Highlands of Scotland and in the northwestern island off of Scotland's coast. The Isle of Man is currently reviving Manx Gaelic (Gaelg).
We must save Gaelic... "a country without a language is a country without a soul."
by Lorelili October 23, 2004
Of or relating to the Gaels, or the ancient Celtic peoples of Ireland(Éireann), Scotland(Alba), and the Isle of Man(Ellan Vannin) in Britain.

It especially refers to their languages: Irish Gaelic(Gaeilge), the most prominent, and her sister languages; Manx Gaelic(Gaelg); and (Scottish) Gaelic(Gàidhlig). Their cousin languages from the Brythonic Celtic languages are Welsh(Cymraeg), Cornish(Kernowek), and Breton(Breizh). All of them possess trilling r's, hard-only c's and g's, gutterals, and soft sounds also. All are poetic, musical, beautiful languages, often sounding very Tolkienesque.

The languages are now fragile after centuries of prejudice from the English. Still interest in them has risen in and around their homelands.
"'S e dùthaich gun anam a th'ann dùthaich gun cànan"?

Gu fìor; tha h-uile rud an-seo airson adhbhar. Gun e/i, marbhaidh 'n iomadachd na t-saoghail seo bìdeag is bìdeag. 'S e cànan àlainn A th'anns a' Ghàidhlig... bu lugha orm e fhaicinn dhol.

Cho fad is bhitheadh na Ceiltich cànanan beò, agus tha ùidh againn orra, bidh ann ronn na dòchais dhaibh.

("A country without a language is a country without a soul"?

Truly; everything is here for a reason. Without it, the diversity of this world will die piece by piece. It is a lovely language that Gaelic is... I would hate to see it go.

As long as the Celtic languages are alive, and we are interested in them, there will be some hope for them.)
by Lorelili March 25, 2005
Gaelic or Goidelic derived from the Gallaic language spoken by the Gallaeci tribes in Gallaecia in N.W. Spain. Gallaic is the Q-Celtic language of the Halstatt Celts that settled in Galicia circa 800 B.C. Celtiberian is also a Q-Celtic language of the La Tene Celts that settled in N.E. Spain circa 500 B.C. These La Tene Celts are known as the Celtiberians.
The word for hundred is "cet" in Old Irish or Old Gaelic and the word for hundred is "kiot" in Gallaic.
by Galaico Warrior August 04, 2007
Of or relating to the Gaels, or the ancient Celtic peoples of Ireland(Éireann), Scotland(Alba), and the Isle of Man(Ellan Vannin) in Britain.

It especially refers to their languages: Irish Gaelic(Gaeilge), the most prominent, and her sister languages; Manx Gaelic(Gaelg); and (Scottish) Gaelic(Gàidhlig). Their cousin languages from the Brythonic Celtic languages are Welsh(Cymrig), Cornish(Kernowek), and Breton(Breizh). All of them possess rolling r's, hard-only c's and g's, gutterals, and soft sounds also. All are poetic, musical, beautiful languages, often sounding very Tolkienesque.

The languages are now fragile after centuries of prejudice from the English. Still interest in them has risen in and around their homelands. There is lingering prejudice and doubt still around, but not quite as bad as it once was.

The Celts have been allowed to speak any language but their own. Why?
"'S e dùthaich gun anam a th'ann dùthaich gun cànan"?

Gu fìor; tha h-uile rud an-seo airson adhbhar. Gun e/i, marbhaidh 'n iomadachd na t-saoghail seo bìdeag is bìdeag. 'S e cànan àlainn a th'anns a' Ghàidhlig... bu lugha orm e fhaicinn dhol.

Cho fad is bhitheadh na Ceiltich cànanan beò, agus tha ùidh againn orra, bidh ann ronn na dòchais dhaibh.

Ach th'ann mòran obair ri dhèanamh.

("A country without a language is a country without a soul"?

Truly; everything is here for a reason. Without it, the diversity of this world will die piece by piece. It is a lovely language that Gaelic is... I would hate to see it go.

As long as the Celtic languages are alive, and we are interested in them, there will be some hope for them.

But there's still much work to do.)
by Lorelili March 26, 2005
Gaelic or Goidelic was introduced by the Gallaeci tribes of Gallaecia (Galicia N.W. Spain) circa 500 B.C. The Gallaeci spoke an archaic Goidelic Q-Celtic tongue known as Gallaic. The Gallaeci were Halstatt Celts that settled in Galicia circa 800 B.C. The Celtiberians spoke Celtiberian Q-Celtic, but not Goidelic. The Celtiberians were La Tene Celts that settled in N.E. Spain circa 500 B.C.
The word for one hundred is "cet" in Old Irish (Old Gaelic) and "ciot" in Gallaic.
by Galaico Warrior August 05, 2007
A language once prominent in many areas of Britain before the English took over and tried to force it out, which sadly happened over time, being almost completally phased out in the 1930s. Today many North Americans with far back Irish roots go around thinking they are Irish 100% and attempt to learn Gaelic, but quickly turn away learning that this language is even less related to English than German.
Gaelic: Is cailín álainn atá inti.
German: Sie ist ein schönes Mädchen.

In English the sentence is "She is a beautiful girl", it's pretty easy to see which of the two languages is easier to understand.
by Ownage_Dillon August 14, 2006
also the word that people outside ireland use to describe the irish language."irish" and "gaeilge" is rarely used outside the emerald isle!
Person 1: oh, you're from ireland.dont you have your own language?gaelic isnt it??
Person 2: yes, its called irish suprisingly enough!
by irish gal June 24, 2006

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