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4.
A mix of french and english, commonly used by blingual private school kids in France.
"Eo,dude! Did ya do the devoirs for math?"
"I can't seem to find my trouce"
"Some whore m'a dit que j'était stupide. Alors, I beat her pretty visage up"
"Franglais is so passé. Every one's like speaking Germenglisch"
by GetWacky November 09, 2006
 
1.
A combonation of two languages: Français and Anglaise (French and English).
Franglais can be either a French conversation peppered with English words, or vice versa.
It is commonly used by French teenagers.
It does not necessarily mean that they have forgotten a word, although using Franglais is a good coverup if they do forget the translation of some words.
The words used DO have proper translations.
Franglais:
Gina: Ah mon amie, veux-tu un beer?
Moi: Non merci, je suis le stuffed. As-tu regardé le episode de Newport Beach hier?!
Gina: Mais bien sûr! Ben McKenzie est un hunk hein?
Moi: Je pense que obviously.

Translated:
Gina: Want a beer?
Me: No thanks, I'm stuffed. Did you watch the O.C. yesterday?!
Gina: Duh! Ben McKenzie is a total hottie eh?
Me: He's rellin.
by Sahara August 09, 2005
 
2.
Used most commonly by Canadian high school students, Franglais (French + Anglais, known also as Frenglish) is a mixture of the two languages in order to suit
a) the speaker's knowledge of the language
b) the speaker's laziness in regards to full translation
or c) the speaker's desire to piss off their French/English teacher.

Franglais has been known to be a diplomatic language between Quebec-the rest of Canada students, and students capable of speaking balanced Franglais are generally considered to be bilingual.
Je suis fluent in Franglais.
by Foreign Hand July 12, 2006
 
3.
Combination of "français" (French) and "anglais" (English), referred to also as Frenglish.

It has two meanings:

1. An Anglophone (or native English speaker) who speaks French as a second language that is:

a) too lazy to think of the correct translation for what they're saying, and therefore incorporate English words into their sentences, or

b) make a direct word-for-word translation of what they wish to say, in which case the translated term doesn't make sense in French.

A common thing done by French Immersion students, especially in Canada.

2. English words that are also used in French.
1. a) French speaker: "Alors, est-ce que tu veux le jus d'orange ou l'eau?" ("So, do you want orange juice or water?")

Franglais speaker: "Je ne care pas." ("I don't care.")

b) Franglais speaker: "Yo, longtemps, pas voir!" (Word-for-word translation of "Yo, long time, no see!")

French speaker: "Quoi...?"

2. "Le soccer," "le hot dog" and "le ski" are examples of English words that are used in the French language.
by Kikyo Maaka May 29, 2009
 
5.
A mix of English and French, usually employed in the presence of lower-level French students or when one can't thing of the French for a word or phrase.

Origin: a mix of the words 'français' and 'anglais', which are French for 'French' and 'English', respectively.
1. I have to talk in Franglais around Kathryn because she's only in French I.

2. Donne-moi some of your Pringles-- je forgot mon déjeuner. (Give me some of your Pringles-- I forgot my lunch.)
by PetitePhilosophe May 24, 2005
 
6.
A mix of English and French, usually employed in the presence of lower-level French students or when one can't think of the French for a word or phrase.

Origin: a mix of the words 'français' and 'anglais', which are French for 'French' and 'English', respectively.
1. I have to speak in Franglais around Kathryn because she's only in French I.

2. Donne-moi some of your Pringles-- je forgot mon déjeuner. (Give me some of your Pringles-- I forgot my lunch.)
by PetitePhilosophe May 27, 2005
 
7.
How you speak to your french teacher to get her REALLY pissed off
Bounjour, Mme, Est-ce que vous-avez vu my mom? elle va get REALLY pissed if Je suis late

2: Vas tu te fuck.
by Mme May 06, 2005