The language of the gangstas and negroes.
Ebonics: "Yo G, you frontin me?"
English: "Excuse me, my peer, are you attempting to influence me to engage in a violent action with you?"

Ebonics: "You gots to git those Benjamins so you cin git dat bling-bling fo yo ride"
English: "You need to get money so that you can get expensive accessories for your car."
by lilpimpfosho April 03, 2003
Consisting of the words ebony and phonics. It is a language that has its roots in American slavery and is commonly associated with African Americans. In no way is it a sign of laziness or child like speech by its speaker. Ebonics has been popularized in the past 20 years by the introduction of rap and hip hop but is seen as a creole language comprised of African and English dialects.
My friends were going home Ebonics would translate into: Mah bros be headin to the heezee.
OR
They came to meet me= They come meet me
They were eating= They was eating

by Madammim November 14, 2007
ebonics is a dialect most commonly used by African-Americans. it involves grammar, punctuation and other things and often changes depending on what state, region you're in. ebonics is NOT slang. those who believe it is only show their ignorance. why would linguists study something that is insignificant. i would suggest those who believe this is only slang to pick up a book on pedagogy, read for clarity and understanding, and if you still don't get it, you never will.
Ebonics - I be wondering why people don't read a book for clarity.
by hericayne May 30, 2007
A version of the English Language, most commonly used by Aferican Americans, and Caucasian Africans.
Ebonics: yo za ga bens na b up wif da shaakzz in da hood, i whoo yo aa niii.

Translation: Hello, how is it going my counterpart, best not be loitering with fellow counterparts in the living space, or I shall engage in violent activities with you, African American.
by Rice Hater June 28, 2005
Literally translated from "ebony" and "phonics", Ebonics is NOT slang, it is NOT an immediate label that categorizes a person's intelligence simply because they speak it, Ebonics is a Regional Vernacular that functions as a Middle to Older compostion of the English language; adding extra negatives, fluctuating tenses and simplifying past/present/future tenses. The Southern American Vernacular is the largest Accent Group in the United States and varies depending upon which regional dialect is in question. The term "Ebonics" has been misconstrued by media into having this reputation of being some "jungle-bunny language" that only non-intellectuals with violent tendencies are prone to use, when in actuality AAE (African American English) is nothing more than a sociocultural form of English that varies between cultures and regions wherein the Southern American English dialects are found.
Metathesised Form Examples: Graps (Grasp), Aks (Ask) / etc.

Dropping Copulas (most commonly recognized and associated with Ebonics): Who you? / Where you at? / Who he be? / Where he been? / You crazy! / Where you put it at? / She my sister. / etc.

Altered Syntax: Why they ain't growin'? / Who the hell she think she is? / Who you think you be? / etc.
by Lapin Blanc October 17, 2008
Contrary to ignorant posts on this website, Ebonics is NOT mere slang. Rather it is a fully-formed, complex, rule-governed system of language that has specific rules for pronunciation, vocabulary, and word order, all of which operate as a complex grammatical system inherited, in part, from West African languages. Attempts to imitate the speech patterns by those who don’t understand the complexities of the grammatical system of Ebonics not only sound ridiculous but also result in usages that are downright linguistically incorrect and culturally demeaning.
Here are four grammatical rules in ebonics:

Habitual “be”: He be mean to me. (meaning: he is habitually mean to me.)
He mean to me. (meaning: he is being mean to me right now.)
She BEEN married. (stressed “been” meaning she’s been married a long time and still is.)
Multiple negative inversion: Can’t nobody beat ‘em.
by ms. Marilyn May 01, 2008
Contrary to ignorant posts on this website, Ebonics is NOT mere slang. Rather it is a fully-formed, complex, rule-governed system of language that has specific rules for pronunciation, vocabulary, and word order, all of which operate as a complex grammatical system inherited, in part, from West African languages. Attempts to imitate the speech patterns by those who don’t understand the complexities of the grammatical system of Ebonics not only sound ridiculous but also result in usages that are downright linguistically incorrect and culturally demeaning.
Examples of rule-governed ebonics features:
Habitual “be”: He be mean to me. (meaning: he is habitually mean to me.)
He mean to me. (meaning: he is being mean to me right now.)
She BEEN married. (stressed “been” meaning she’s been married a long time and still is.)
Multiple negative inversion: Can’t nobody beat ‘em.
by Ms. Marilyn April 22, 2008
What happens when crackers try to put a label on Black jive.
Cracker: "Johnson, I believe that colored fellow just called me a muthafukin, skinny-ass, honky."

Cracker too: "Pay no attention to him, Charlie. He was just speaking his ebonics in saying you are a rather thin, Anglo-Saxon, who does the deed with his mother."
by Melvin V. Peebles March 05, 2007

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