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4.
To finish off or complete in a forceful way.
I just dunnished that math test.
by red stapler February 23, 2006
1 1
 
1.
adj. Somewhat dun or dusky.

v.t. 1. To consume completely. 2. To have sexual congress with. 3. To achieve victory and dominance, esp. through violence or in combat; to destroy or to disfigure.

Inflected forms: dunnished, dunnishing, dunnishes
Other forms: dunnishment (n.)

Notes on usage and etymology. As a verb, the term is comparable to the verb "to pound." It is also somewhat similar in its connotations to the phrase "to do the job (on)," as used in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather" (1969), where it is used both as a sexual euphemism and as a phrase denoting a "hit." One theory traces the word "dunnish" from the German "Donnerschmied," meaning "thundersmith"; presumably, this was converted into English as "dunnishment," and the verb "to dunnish" was the result of a back-formation. More likely, however, "dunnish" is a portmanteau word, combining the words "done" and "punish," or possibly "done" and "finish."
1. We totally dunnished those cases of beers for Newman's Day.
2. Don't go in; Jason's in there dunnishing his girlfriend.
3. In a night of drunken debauchery and dunnishment, Bill and his guests just dunnished all the furniture in the room.
by Jinnentonik April 24, 2006
9 0
 
2.
Somewhere between the verb 'punish', and the verb 'done'
Before it was time to go, we all dunnished our beers on the way out.
by Clinton Yates August 15, 2005
11 2
 
3.
adj. Somewhat dun or dusky.

v.t. 1. To consume completely. 2. To have sexual congress with. 3. To achieve victory and dominance, esp. through violence or in combat; to destroy or to disfigure.

Inflected forms: dunnished, dunnishing, dunnishes
Other forms: dunnishment (n.)

Notes on usage and etymology. As a verb, the term is comparable to the verb "to pound." It is also somewhat similar in its connotations to the phrase "to do the job (on)," as used in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather" (1969), where it is used both as a sexual euphemism and as a phrase denoting a "hit." One theory traces the word "dunnish" from the German "Donnerschmied," meaning "thundersmith"; presumably, this was converted into English as "dunnishment," and the verb "to dunnish" was the result of a back-formation. More likely, however, "dunnish" is a portmanteau word, combining the words "done" and "punish," or possibly "done" and "finish."
1. We totally dunnished those cases of beers for Newman's Day.
2. Don't go in; Jason's in there dunnishing his girlfriend.
3. In a night of drunken debauchery and dunnishment, Bill and his guests just dunnished all the furniture in the room.
by Jinnentonik May 05, 2006
1 0
 
5.
adj. Somewhat dun or dusky.

v.t. 1. To consume completely. 2. To have sexual congress with. 3. To achieve victory and dominance, esp. through violence or in combat; to destroy or to disfigure.

Inflected forms: dunnished, dunnishing, dunnishes
Other forms: dunnishment (n.)

Notes on usage and etymology. As a verb, the term is comparable to the verb "to pound." It is also somewhat similar in its connotations to the phrase "to do the job (on)," as used in Mario Puzo's novel "The Godfather" (1969), where it is used both as a sexual euphemism and as a phrase denoting a "hit." One theory traces the word "dunnish" from the German "Donnerschmied," meaning "thundersmith"; presumably, this was converted into English as "dunnishment," and the verb "to dunnish" was the result of a back-formation. More likely, however, "dunnish" is a portmanteau word, combining the words "done" and "punish," or possibly "done" and "finish."
1. We totally dunnished those cases of beers for Newman's Day.
2. Don't go in; Jason's in there dunnishing his girlfriend.
3. In a night of drunken debauchery and dunnishment, Bill and his guests just dunnished all the furniture in the room.
by Jinnentonik May 03, 2006
0 1