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9.
Arse
Arse refers to the buttocks or in the case of arsehole, the anus, in British English.

In most contexts it is the equivalent to Ass in American English, but is not a direct replacement.

Arse is a four letter anglo saxon word. It is earthy, profound and very functional both as a term for parts of the body and as a term of abuse.
In Countries that speak British English it is considered a little less profound and offensive that 'certain other' well-known four letter words, but still wouldn't be used in polite company.

In American English speaking countries ‘arse’ is sometimes used as a more polite or less offensive version of ass.

In British English ass has been used until recently only to refer to a wild donkey.

Because a wild donkey is stupid and stubborn, ass is used in British English speaking countries as a term of abuse too, but the meaning is subtly different to arse.

Hence ‘stubborn ass’, as in ‘stubborn as a mule’. Similarly: stupid ass and silly ass,

"Don't be such an ass"! Is different in meaning to "Don't be such an arse"! In British English.

The sentence "I hate that arse, he is such a stubborn ass" makes sense in British English. It makes no sense in American English.

Sometimes people who speak British English use the word 'ass' to refer to the buttocks, too. This is a recent development either because they think it is cool to use America slang (too much television, maybe) or they do not wish to swear, in which case 'ass' is considered a soft alternative, considered suitable by some for children or old ladies.

Arse is more versatile than ass, being the root for such words as 'arsey', 'arseing' and 'arsed'.

Arsey: To be rude or unco-operative.
Arseing: As in 'Arseing around', to fool around or be silly.
Arsed: To take the trouble to do something, as in "I can't be arsed to do that"
Examples:

"Get off your fat arse you lazy ass"

"Stop arseing around"

"If you weren't such a stubborn ass you would have got some cream for your sore arse"

"You just shot that ass in the arse!"

"I say arse because I speak British English, not because I'm frightened of swearing, you silly ass!"

"You lazy ass, you just can't be arsed, can you?", "Don't you get arsey with me!", "Well, stop arseing around, then!"
by SAHBfan on Dec 17, 2008

by SAHBfan December 22, 2008
 
1.
Australian, British and Irish word for a person's rear end.

Unlike America, we spell it properly :P
I'm sitting on my arse.
by ChibiTaryn August 01, 2003
 
2.
A BUTT. Yes, it is just another word for a butt. Please stop ranting about it.
You, good sir, are an arse.
by jojojojo June 24, 2005
 
3.
British, Oz, Irish definition of the derriere, backside, bum, bottom, etc...

It is NOT a FANNY as you yanks call it, a fanny is a front bottom, vagina, beaver, hairy axe wound etc...
'Don't you stick that up my arse, it hurts.'
by Posh birds do it best February 07, 2005
 
4.
British (rather than exclusively Irish as previously asserted) pronunciation of 'ass'. To be used in the same context. Like the red squirrel by its grey cousin, this particular word is danger of being subsumed by the increasingly popular 'ass'. Can I urge you all to protect your arse if you want to keep it.
1. Your arse is quite delicious
2. Oh ARSE! I have spilt my pint.
3. Your mouth smells of arse.
by dogshelf March 28, 2005
 
5.
A british slang word, which has the same meaning as ass, which is bum.

Can be added to the end of a sentence, to contradict the meaning of the sentence.
im gonna kick your arse!
Ow, my arse hurts!
You'll marry him, my arse!
by krackpipe December 13, 2003
 
6.
The original variant of the vulgar word "ass" in American English.

Etymology:

Until the Victorian period, "ass" had no profane meaning and simply referred to what we now call the donkey. Because of the increasingly non-rhotic nature of standard British English, "arse" was often rendered "ass". The age of Victorian propriety resulted in the rechristening of the horse-like animal, changing the name to "donkey" to avoid any improper inferences. This usage was also adopted in America, which is why the word "arse" is not usually used in the United States. Some people in Britain have adopted the American version in writing. Although before World War I they were similar, the British pronunciations of "ass" (IPA /æs/) and "arse" (IPA /α:s/) are now quite different.

Source: Wikipedia.

Sorry, but "ass" just sounds more pleasantly vulgar.
Linguistic elitist Briton arses, like the ones on this definition, are known for their pathetic uses of etymology to try and insult the intellect of Americans and -- in this particular case -- Canadians.
by Shreve Lamb and Harmon September 28, 2005
 
7.
The original spelling of the word that has now been high jacked by the dumb-arse yanks - still means a rear end or stupid.
The stupid arse-hole American had a face like a spanked arse.
by Your Mamas Growler October 03, 2003