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4.
Another sign that the media is TRYING to make us all stupider.
John: "Yo, where you at?"
Kelly: "THAT'S A DANGLING PARTICIPLE, YOU UNEDUCATED MONKEY." *Slap!!*
John: *Runs off cowering.*
Kelly: "THAT'S RIGHT. Ignore cell phone commercials and re-learn what your second grade teacher tried in vain to get through your thick skull."

And we never heard from poor John again.
by afterthegoldrush September 04, 2005
86 65
 
1.
ebonics: the uneducated way of asking "where are you". an urban expression that is usually spoken on the telephone to determine someone's location. This expression has been used for years in the hood and has been around long before cell phones existed.
"hello"
Hi Girl what's up?
"Where you at?
by dkwatson May 16, 2005
96 43
 
2.
A commonly asked question despite its incorrect use of english. This sentence ends in a preposition and its use should be forbidden.
Where you at : 7 out of 10 people use this phrase on a regular basis. Please refer to television, radio, MTV, or random conversations in your local city.
by Kraemer05811 August 03, 2006
56 24
 
3.
sad attempt by Mobile to connect with a younger, "hipper" generation. Also a rampant exploitation of the frail elderly...these people are forced to speak in Ebonics, talk to Ludacris, wear ridiculous hairstyles, and say things nobody says like "I'm at this bangin party, yo" and "Peace up..."
Where you at? the whole city's behind us!
by smashingpumpkins June 25, 2005
55 32
 
5.
1. a term used to ask a person where they are.

2. a term used to ask a person how they are.

3. a term used to ask a person how far along they are, i.e. on a homework assignment.

4. simply a greeting.
1. julie, where you at!?

2. hey beth - where you at?

3. where you at on the english paper?

4. where you at, mo?
by yevson December 24, 2006
16 5
 
6.
1) The question that arose mid-ninties in response to the gang-related question "Where you from?", the purpose being a greeting that identifies the asker as a civilian and confers a subtle assumption that the person being asked is also a civilian or is not gang-related anymore.

2) A deviation of Standard English that asks about location.
"No, it ain't 'where you're from', you know it's 'Where you at?'" - Lighter Shade of Brown
by Mikk April 10, 2006
20 16
 
7.
Cool way of saying "Where are you?", popularized by Boost Mobile cellular phone commercials.
Where you at?
I'm chillin with fabulous! We're gettin our freak on.
by T Compton October 30, 2004
16 53