1. noun A woman of ill-repute who is the objet d'amor of a tallywhacker.

2. interjection. What a man yells to his tallywhacker when he sees #1 above.
1. Hey Ron, let's go down to the zone and pick up a tallyho.

2. TALLYHO!!!
by Ron April 01, 2004
A word used by many British and common wealth Military personel in the 19th and 20th Centuarys.

It basically means charge.

Unfortunatly from the 1950's to the present day, this has become a common steriotype in america for what British people say when in fact that has been said more often in america than it ever has in Britain.
Mr. JohnEveryAmerican : Hay look a british person, Tally ho pip pip

Mr. Englishman : Fuck off you Bell End
by Eastern Person2 April 13, 2006
A military term with the exact translation 'target in site'.

As appose to "visual" which translates to 'friendly in site'.
Rifles at the ready! Tall-ho! CHARGE!
by StuartCarrison May 17, 2005
Phrase used by english-speaking fighter pilots to confirm that they have spotted an enemy aircraft.
AWACS (Chalis-1): Viper-2, Chalis-1, be advised, bandits at your 3 o' clock, 10 miles, 4000, clear to engage, over.

F-35 Pilot (Viper-2): Chalis-1, Viper-2, Tally Ho!
by KingKenny04 February 27, 2010
(Foxhunting) The phrase uttered by a member of the hunt who sees the fox

(Aviation) (carried over from foxhunting) The phrase uttered by a pilot advising that he sees the air traffic that has been called out for him
(Foxhunting) Member of the hunt seeing the fox: "Tally-ho!"

(Aviation) Ground Control: "United 234, your traffic is a 737 at your ten o'clock descending through your altitude."

United 234: "Roger, Tally-ho!"
by FTom January 29, 2011
A battle cry used by europeans that is the best battle cry since AUGH
Soldier:"their coming and we're outnumbered 20 to 1, what should we do?"
Commander"TALLY HO"(points sword towards enemys)
by Patrick October 16, 2004
This word was traditionally brought into use in foxhunting, it was used when one person from the hunt saw a fox, and he would shout this word to indicate to the others in the hunt that a fox had been spotted. It then came into use in World War II when pilots of the Royal Air Force saw enemy aircraft.
Air Traffic Control: Bandits, to the south east, around 5 mile range.
Pilot: Tallyho old chap!
by Nicky148 September 04, 2008

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