look up any word, like thot:
 
8.
Like someone wrote before, it's the worst genre I've ever heard, pure garbage.

It came from the spanish reggae, wich is not bad, the lyrics talk about women and sex, obviously, but also the kind of relations that this people from central America have. There is one artist that made this music popular, his name is Edgardo A. Franco but he is known as "El General", he sings in a very unique way and has been the most imitated artist in this genre. But he's not part of this reggaeton thing. Reggaeton is annoying and I consider it is music for ignorants.
Reggaeton is garbage, don't listen to it.
by Petrus April 10, 2006
 
9.
A type of music which mostly originated from Puerto Rico. Ironic, though, that it's called REGGAEton when it sounds almost nothing like actual reggae. It's more like rap with Spanish vocals.

But anyway... it is a type of music where:
1. Every song has the same beat
2. Every artist sounds the same
3. Every song is about the same thing: Women

Seriously, just listen to ONE reggaeton song and you've heard every single song in the universe. There is absolutely nothing that makes one song any different from another except for the lyrics themselves, which don't even matter because every artist basically sounds the same - uses the same vocal style and uses the same subject matter. It has even less variety than rap, which is sad indeed.

Is usually played at dance parties to get all the people to dance, which is mostly the only reason why it's popular - because it's dance music. You really can't use reggaeton for anything else other than dancing, because if you actually LISTEN to it, trust me - you're not gonna find anything new.
Do you want to make stupid people dance? Just get one reggaeton song - ANY song. It'll work. Don't bother trying to look for something specific - you'll get the same result in any other song. But reggaeton sucks anyway.
by SomeBadJoke August 22, 2006
 
10.
Reggaeton or "Spanish reggae," as it's sometimes called, is a genre of music totally unlike reggae in every single way despite its name. Despite some subtle differences and differing tempos, every Reggaeton song virtually has the same beat. It also always has some talentless loser rapping in Spanish about how much he loves sex. You can usually hear it playing from people's cars or ipods. The people who listen to it ALWAYS turn it up obnoxiously loud because they're insecure and want to try to impress everyone by showing them their "good" taste in music.
Reggaeton really sucks
by lxkcvnb May 03, 2006
 
11.
First of all, I'm a College Hispanic.

Reggaeton is a retarded form of music that only ignorant Latino people such as gangbangers, uneducated school drop-outs, or Hispanic Criminals listen too. Those kind of people don't like Metal, Classical, Jazz, or anything else; only there cheaply made repeatative synthesized beat with awful rap lyrics in Spanish. Of course, they might always lie and say they like all kinds of music to not sound too ignorant...

But to be honest, other forms of music that do not get any recognition such as Melodic Death Metal will always be superior compare to Reggaeton!!! That should actually be called Horribleton. Peace...
Don Omar (what a wannabe!)

Looney Toons (maricon bastards)

Reggaeton shit is fucking nigger music in Spanish!
What the fuck is the matter with all you Black puppet Spics? And to all you future gay mother-fuckers that are gonna talk shit against the truth, go fuck yourselves!
by I Am The Lord July 14, 2006
 
12.
Sadly much of the fame of "reggaeton" started in Puerto Rico, it was highly influenced by what before was called "underground". In these past few years it has spread all over the world, but that is not only because of Puerto Ricans, it is because of a demand for really bad music that is occuring everywhere, from Britney Spears to Daddy Yankee. The lyrics are pretty lame, ignorant, and it is very popular among many.

Do not associate Puerto Rico with Reggaeton though. In this island there is also a constant battle with this shit, and not every young person here cares for it. We also listen to other music that is a great part of the culture, from salsa and merengue, to bomba and plena.

From a 22 year old Puerto Rican from the mother fucking island..... FUCK REGGAETON. period.
el reggaeton es una mierda.
by absolut tarita June 29, 2006
 
13.
reggaeton is not actually just Puerto Rico's version of reggae...if you do the research you'll find that reggaeton first came around in panama as "spanish reggae". It has evolved to become "perreo", "dembow", or just "reggaeton"
i like reggaeton
me gusta el reggaeton
by fred February 28, 2005
 
14.
Reggaeton (also spelled Regueton or with an accent) is a Latin style of music. Reggaeton is Panamanian, but has grown to be more associated with "Boricuas" (Puerto Ricans), some claiming the genre as their own. It is characterized by a certain beat called "dem bow", which is a traditional Carribean beat but was first popularized by dancehall musician Shabba Ranks's song with a title of the same name. An example of the beat can be heard on that song or simply defined as A-A-B (or ch-ch-bass) or B-B-A (bass, bass, ch). Its influences include Hip hop, techno and Reggae dancehall, and touches of merengue, salsa, bachata, bolero and other Latin music can be featured. Unlike reggae, it does not use "riddims", instrumentals created by producers who can be used by any artists, most of the time, but exceptions can be made, such as Deejay Sasha and Ivy Queen's "Dat Sexy Body", which uses the Bookshelf Riddim originating from Reggae dancehall artist Beenie Man.

After Raggamuffin (dancehall) deejays from Panama including El General and Black Apache experimented with the same beat, they began "toasting" over it (a kind of Jamaican-style rapping which occurs when talking, rhyming, or singing is done over a beat) in Spanish. It further transformed with the likes of Don Chezina, Vico C, Las Guanabanas, DJ Blass, DJ Playero, and other Puerto ricans and Dominicans who discovered this then-emerging genre, and began rapping instead of toasting.

Singles from the next millenium broke Reggaeton into the mainstream music scene, such as Panamanian rapper Lorna's "Papi Chulo (Te Traigo el Mmm)" and half- Puerto Rican N.O.R.E. (also known Noreaga)'s "Oye Mi Canto" (featuring Nina sky, Daddy Yankee, and Gemstar and Big Mato).

Finally, Daddy Yankee's tremendously successful song "Gasolina" (written by Eddie Dee and produced by Luny Tunes) reached #1 in the United States Latin music charts, and then gained huge acclaim in Colombia, Mexico, Italy, France, the UK, and Germany.

At various stages, Reggaeton has been known as "Musica underground", "Dembow", "Spanish dancehall", or "Reggae en espanol", but was then finally known as its current name in the early 2000s.

Related genres similar to reggaeton include Salsaton, Merenhouse, Bachateo, and Bhangraton. Reggaeton is like, but not synonymous to, Latin rap. This is because Latin rap defines any rap recorded by artists of Hispanic or Spanish-speaking descent who rap in either Spanish, English or both, where reggaeton has specific influences and is mainly classified by the previously stated Dembow beat.

Today, Reggaeton has gained popularity and is being much experimented with throughout Latin America, especially in countries like Peru, Colombia, Venezuela, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Cuba and the Dominican Republic. Unfortunately, it is one of the most plagiarized genres in the music industry.

Some prominent reggaeton artists and producers or artists that have experimented with the genre (not listed in sequence of importance) include Daddy Yankee, Wisin and Yandel, Tego Calderon, Calle 13, Bimbo, Nicky Jam, Luny Tunes, Don Omar, Eliel, Pescozada, El Chombo, Ariel, Casper, DJ Playero, Don Miguelo, Kartier, Tony Dize, El Rubiote, Franco "El Gorilla", El Sensei, Rafy Mercenario, Rakim y Ken-y, Cheka, Yomo, Naldo, Lito y Polaco, Zion y Lennox, Voltio, Hector El Father, Tito El Bambino, Trebol Clan, Ingco Crew, Baby Rasta, Gringo, Arcangel, Tainy, Plan B, Alexis y Fido, John Eric, El General, Lorna, Killer Ranks, Wise, Big Boy, Eddie Dee, Angel y Khriz, Tony Dize, Johnny Prez, Fulanito, Gem star and Big Mato, Vico C, Ivy Queen, Tony Touch, Don Chezina, El General, D'Mingo, Heavy Clan, DJ Pollo, Magnate and Valentino, Baby Ranks, Sasha, Speedy, La Sista, and others.
Reggaeton can be heard on songs such as:

"Gasolina"
"Chulin Culin Chunfly"
"Dile"
"Oye Mi Canto"
"Quiero Bailar"
"Papi Chulo"
"Rakata"
"Dat Sexy Body"
"Reggaeton Latino"
"Papi te Quiero"
"Cuando Baila Reggaeton"
"Que Se Tiren"
"Pa' Que Retozen"
"Para Mi Barrio (Reggaeton Mix)"
"Con Rabia"
"A Que No a Treves"
"Tra Tra Tra"
"Lo Que Paso Paso"
"Dejala Volar"
"Caramelo"
"Ella no te quiere"
"Cuerpo a Cuerpo"
"Ponte de Pie"
"Eso Ehh...!"
"Verme"
"El Telefono"

Keep in mind that these are only some of the songs that give a good example.

Some albums that mostly feature reggaeton include:

Daddy Yankee's "Barrio Fino" (or the live version, Barrio Fino en Directo")
Don Omar's "The Last Don"
Ivy Queen's "Diva"
Don Chezina's "Reggaeton Revolucion"
Luny Tunes's "King of the Beats", "Mas Flow: The Beginning", "Mas Flow 2", "Mas Flow 2.5", and "Mas Flow: Los Benjamins", which feature other reggaeton artists
Heavy Clan's "Cuerpo a Cuerpo"
Hector El Father's "The Bad Boy"
Tito el Bambino's "Top of the Line"
Rakim and Ken-y's "Masterpiece"
Wisin and Yandel's "Pa'l Mundo", and "Wisin y Yandel Presentan: Los Vaqueros"
Andy Montanez's "Salsaton: Salsa con Reggaeton"
Alexis and Fido's "The Pitbulls"
Voltio's self titled album, "Voltio"
Baby Rasta y Gringo's "Sentenciados"

Some (only some) Reggaeton compilations are:

"Sangre Nueva (Special Edition)"
"Los Rompe Discotekas"
"Gargolas-The Next Generation"
"Abusando del Genero"
"Reggaeton Hitmakers"
"Reggaeton Fury"
"Chosen Few: El Documental"
"100% Dominicano: La Nueva Sangre del Reggaeton"
"Dancehall Reggaespanol" (shows a more primitive form of Reggaeton)

Some Reggaeton record labels are:
Machete Music
Buddha's Family
Pina Records
Sangre Nueva Music
El Cartel Records
RB Entertainmet
Alex Music
Tommy Boy Entertainment
Don Ricardo Garcia international
by Gringostyle January 05, 2007