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3.
The famous "special move" of the late Bruce Lee, based on a technique known in kung fu as "fa jing", which can be described with the following example: you know that when you try to get a tree out of a garden or a nail out of a piece of wood, you tend to jerk at it repeatedly, rather than pull continuously? It's sort of like that: by moving a part of his body with a quick jerk, rather than a constant force, Bruce Lee (and probably quite a few skilled kung fu practicioners) was able to release a large force from a seemingly short distance.
Some examples of fa jing can be found in tai chi and wing chun I think.
by ketter June 07, 2005
 
1.
An explosive short range punch, made famous by the late Bruce Lee. Seemingly magical to the unlearned, it is actually the result of a perfect synchronisation of all the muscles used in a regular punch (shortened down to about 1 inch). Requires extremely high skill to be effective.
by Anonymous November 03, 2003
 
2.
A devastating and extremely powerful strike from the fist that emanates from Bruce Lee's Jeet Kune Do. The fist strikes the target from only one inch away yet the punch can transfer an incredible force. See also JKD
I gave him a one inch punch and sent his ass flying
by JediAndi April 04, 2003
 
4.
A technique in which one strikes an opponent with a punch from a literal (though, of course, there's always variation in length) one-inch windup. Power comes from a martial art concept, Fa Jing, commonly translated along the lines of "explosive power," to deliver backbreaking force as efficiently as possible.

Commonly believed to originate in Wing Chun kung fu, although similar techniques were and are used throughout southern China. Made popular in the west due to a display at Long Beach by the legendary Bruce Lee, who borrowed elements of said Wing Chun from his training in adolescence to create his own Jeet Kune Do.
For a particularly visual homage and/or example to the One Inch Punch, see Bruce Lee knockoff Fei Long's second Ultra combo in Super Street Fighter IV.
by Stefan-sama October 11, 2010
 
5.
In Jeet Kune Do one has four fighting distances: Kicking range, punching range, trapping range and grappling range. Very few Martial Arts have these many. Usually they only have 2 or 3 ranges. The one inch punch is used in the trapping range. In trapping range you are too close for a kick and too close for a western boxing punch. It's short and very explosive and it doesn't have to be "loaded" to make damage. One needs to train very hard to get it right. I have been training Jeet kune do for about four years now and I say its about speed and timing.
by Ender November 05, 2003
 
6.
The One Inch Punch, made famous by possibly the best martial artists in the world. Bruce Lee had speed so fast you could feel the pain but not see the fist, his power was ASTOUNDING! For your information, "Wing Chun guy" he was good at the one inch punch. I know he never learned it properly but he could beat the hell out of you! Plus Bruce Lee knew it was a move which could possibly kill you. But the reason he "pushed" was because he would kill him if he did and plus it was added that way for effect on the on lookers! So shut up "wanna" be Wing Chun Guy. And another thing he did not steal the one inch punch he borrowed as it is not a system it is a concept. So keep your trap closed!
The One Inch Punch
by Dim Mak September 03, 2003
 
7.
The one inch punch was originally borrowed from Wing Chun, but improved by Bruce Lee. However, in the famous One inch punch video, the guy who is hit by Mr. Lee is prepared, and stood in a classical stance, so he would fall backwards and decrease some of the power. If he was struggling against Mr. Lee he would have received an extremely unhealthy amount of damage.
- "wow that Wing Chung guy really didn't know what he was talking about!"

- "Yeah, the One inch punch that Bruce lee developed is a great skill to know in a close combat situation."

- "give me you're wallet"

- "what?"
by Pål June 05, 2005